Vuelta a España Vuelta a España 2020: Stage 13 (Muros > Mirador de Ézaro 33.7 km ITT)

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Can anyone elaborate or talk about Roglič's position on a TT bike? For years i thought he's great at this and results were great too. He was praised for his position. But now i hear more and more from tv commentators/forum people that his position is bad?
I am not a specialist, but I think his position is fine. He has some good results in that yearly Tirreno-Adriatico time trial too.
2016: 51.4 km/h (-2.3 km/h compared to the winner)
2017: 52.5 km/h (-0.9 km/h)
2018: 52.3 km/h (-1.3 km/h)
2019: 51.7 km/h (-0.9 km/h)

I do not think, that one can lose only 1 km/h against the heavier time trial specialists with a bad position.
 
Reactions: Red Rick
I am not a specialist, but I think his position is fine. He has some good results in that yearly Tirreno-Adriatico time trial too.
2016: 51.4 km/h (-2.3 km/h compared to the winner)
2017: 52.5 km/h (-0.9 km/h)
2018: 52.3 km/h (-1.3 km/h)
2019: 51.7 km/h (-0.9 km/h)

I do not think, that one can lose only 1 km/h against the heavier time trial specialists with a bad position.
Yeah he's naturally very aero, and probably benefits from this on the road bike too.
 
Why a bike change for 1.8 kilometers of climb?? I don't understand. You probably lose more time in that interval if you come at full speed.
If the change is made thoughtful, i.e. in slow tempo and fluent bike change with the bike already in the right gear, it could take a very few seconds.
But now I've watched those kind of bike changes a lot the recent years. Even the top teams seems not to have trained those simple factors, but seems just so clumsy.
And at a such short climb it can be crusial. Arbitrary mechanics at a Formula One team should have plenty of room for coaching to find the extra seconds.
 
As we all know what the most likely outcome today is...

...what's the minimum amount Rogla has to gain today for you to conclude that the race is in the bag (barring miracles)?
Well, anything happening anywhere else but La Covatilla is a small miracle in itself.

I think he'd look really safe with like 40-50 seconds in hand on Carapaz with only La Covatilla left.
 
Reactions: Sandisfan
Tanfield talked about the bike change a bit yesterday (starting at ~5:30), different setups and so on. According to him, given the very flat nature of the course, if he sets up the time trial bike for the flat (big chainring and so on), he gains ~15s in that part. So without a bike change, you don't only lose time on the climb, but also on the flat, meaning there's more of a buffer (compared to the Tour for example, where the first part was on more undulating terrain)

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Rv1bfpeRvA
 
I am not a specialist, but I think his position is fine. He has some good results in that yearly Tirreno-Adriatico time trial too.
2016: 51.4 km/h (-2.3 km/h compared to the winner)
2017: 52.5 km/h (-0.9 km/h)
2018: 52.3 km/h (-1.3 km/h)
2019: 51.7 km/h (-0.9 km/h)

I do not think, that one can lose only 1 km/h against the heavier time trial specialists with a bad position.
I think he was specifically asking about his position on that Tour ITT on stage 20. Some people on Slovenian forum talked about how his position on that ITT looked funny and different from his usual position. I think he looked ok on the flat part. Of course when he exploded on the climb, with his elbows out, he didn't look good on a bike. But that's to be expected in such situation.
 
Reactions: BlueRoads
Just looking at the start times, i.e. Roglic (for example) at 16:34 PM, that's almost 48 hours after the Angliru stage finished. I know these guys do lots of warm-up & training during rest days & before the actual time trial starts, but it's often been said certain riders react differently the day after a rest day in a grand tour & their performance can sometimes suffer. Especially considering Angliru was so hard, then there's a rest, then kaboom there's an individual time trial which is a completely different sort of effort compared to climbing a near vertical wall on Sunday.

It's just something to consider on days like today. We could see some gaps.
 
Reactions: Carols
Just looking at the start times, i.e. Roglic (for example) at 16:34 PM, that's almost 48 hours after the Angliru stage finished. I know these guys do lots of warm-up & training during rest days & before the actual time trial starts, but it's often been said certain riders react differently the day after a rest day in a grand tour & their performance can sometimes suffer. Especially considering Angliru was so hard, then there's a rest, then kaboom there's an individual time trial which is a completely different sort of effort compared to climbing a near vertical wall on Sunday.

It's just something to consider on days like today. We could see some gaps.
Last year the ITT was the day after the rest day, and the day before the rest day was the queen stage in Andorra.
 

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