A Theory

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Aug 13, 2009
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Wasn't there another troll that tried to convince us that Armstrong's sudden improvement came from "Frontal Lobe Development"?

Wonder what happened to that guy?
 
Jul 23, 2009
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Race Radio said:
Wasn't there another troll that tried to convince us that Armstrong's sudden improvement came from "Frontal Lobe Development"?

Wonder what happened to that guy?

Cool! Is there a specific exercise for that?
 
Dec 18, 2009
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Race Radio said:
Wasn't there another troll that tried to convince us that Armstrong's sudden improvement came from "Frontal Lobe Development"?

Wonder what happened to that guy?

That sounds like a far fetched idea. However, fighting to resume physical capacities after brain surgery (and Cancer in Lance's case) would require one to dig deep and push themselves to new limits. So I think we can all agree that what Lance and Alberto have experienced has indeed made them better bike racers.
 
Phantom Menace said:
That sounds like a far fetched idea. However, fighting to resume physical capacities after brain surgery (and Cancer in Lance's case) would require one to dig deep and push themselves to new limits. So I think we can all agree that what Lance and Alberto have experienced has indeed made them better bike racers.

I think we can all agree that you have used "I think we can all agree" before.
 
Dec 18, 2009
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Hugh Januss said:
I think we can all agree that you have used "I think we can all agree" before.

Race Radio uses this term as well.

Do you think fighting to come back to the sport you love would make you stronger or weaker?
 
Phantom Menace said:
Race Radio uses this term as well.

Do you think fighting to come back to the sport you love would make you stronger or weaker?

It varies from athlete to athlete and their circumstances.
Generally, most fail to reach the same level. Many fail altogether.
Doesn't matter how much mental digging you do, if the body can't cope.
 
Mar 18, 2009
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Mellow Velo said:
Doesn't matter how much mental digging you do, if the body can't cope.

"My dad used to say what doesn't kill you makes you stronger........until the accident"
 
Aug 12, 2009
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the vagabond said:
Left-handed people are more likely to become president of the U.S. than right-handed people. Statistically passes 99% confidence level. Why? Sample size is large enough to make randomness unlikely.

People who are good at cycling are more inclined toward baldness, depression, and mathematical ability than the population at large. (I don't have data for this, but any observant person who has been around cycling for a long time knows it's true.)

Your theory is weak, non-intuitive, and unworthy of serious discussion.

I better watch out then. My family history has all three. No wonder I love cycling.
 
Aug 13, 2009
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Phantom Menace said:
That sounds like a far fetched idea. However, fighting to resume physical capacities after brain surgery (and Cancer in Lance's case) would require one to dig deep and push themselves to new limits. So I think we can all agree that what Lance and Alberto have experienced has indeed made them better bike racers.

I think we can all agree you have been banned multiple times for trolling. Why do you keep coming back, do you not have a real life?
 

Rex Hunter

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Dec 18, 2009
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Phantom Menace said:
That sounds like a far fetched idea.

Actually it's rudimentary science. It's why you'll note people in your own life usually improve at doing their jobs, especially if it is skill based, after they've reached their biological peek period between 19 to 25. Judgement and reasoning, which is dictated by the frontal lobe area of the brain, does not fully mature until your mid 20s.

For a sport like cycling where a great deal of discipline for training, and judgement during a race, is used, this is naturally important. And for someone like Armstrong, who was more immature and angry than your average young rider, this process would be more important. Put that together with the mental benefits of the cancer process - something that you rightly highlight -and we can all agree this process would impact Armstrong more than most. It doesn't necessarily explain his entire improvement, but it shows why he certainly would be a better rider after his mid 20s than before it, and indeed why that is the case for most riders or sportsmen - or indeed for any individual in their ordinary lives. Weren't we all stupid as F and less focused as young people? Didn't we take more silly risks when we were driving etc? We can all agree on that.
 
Phantom Menace said:
That sounds like a far fetched idea. However, fighting to resume physical capacities after brain surgery (and Cancer in Lance's case) would require one to dig deep and push themselves to new limits. So I think we can all agree that what Lance and Alberto have experienced has indeed made them better bike racers.

And I think we can all agree that pumping cytotoxic chemicals into your body will make you a worse cyclist.
 
Rex Hunter said:
Actually it's rudimentary science. It's why you'll note people in your own life usually improve at doing their jobs, especially if it is skill based, after they've reached their biological peek period between 19 to 25. Judgement and reasoning, which is dictated by the frontal lobe area of the brain, does not fully mature until your mid 20s.

For a sport like cycling where a great deal of discipline for training, and judgement during a race, is used, this is naturally important. And for someone like Armstrong, who was more immature and angry than your average young rider, this process would be more important. Put that together with the mental benefits of the cancer process - something that you rightly highlight -and we can all agree this process would impact Armstrong more than most. It doesn't necessarily explain his entire improvement, but it shows why he certainly would be a better rider after his mid 20s than before it, and indeed why that is the case for most riders or sportsmen - or indeed for any individual in their ordinary lives. Weren't we all stupid as F and less focused as young people? Didn't we take more silly risks when we were driving etc? We can all agree on that.

Oh yeah, Mister Smarty-Pants, if the frontal lobe is so important, why did the Federation beat the Klingons, huh? You tell me that!


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Polish

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Mar 11, 2009
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Moose McKnuckles said:
Oh yeah, Mister Smarty-Pants, if the frontal lobe is so important, why did the Federation beat the Klingons, huh? You tell me that!
]

Hanging chads? Galactic mis-count?
 
Wait, wait! I just now saw this thread and have very important information that may add credence to the OP's theory.

Noted brain surgeon Frank Vertosick, MD wrote a popular book called "When The Air Hits Your Brain... (...things are never the same), Tales from Neurosurgery."

Now, I don't recall anything at all about greater strength, or anything like that. But I do recall him writing about some moderate, but noticeable behavior issues, and many many stories about people commenting on friends who were indeed never the same again after air hit their brain, some of them like walking zombies...and no, we're not talking lobotomized patients either. Just strange, off-beat personality changes.

:)

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Mar 18, 2009
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Alpe d'Huez said:
Wait, wait! I just now saw this thread and have very important information that may add credence to the OP's theory.

Noted brain surgeon Frank Vertosick, MD wrote a popular book called "When The Air Hits Your Brain... (...things are never the same), Tales from Neurosurgery."

Now, I don't recall anything at all about greater strength, or anything like that. But I do recall him writing about some moderate, but noticeable behavior issues, and many many stories about people commenting on friends who were indeed never the same again after air hit their brain, some of them like walking zombies...and no, we're not talking lobotomized patients either. Just strange, off-beat personality changes.

:)

9780393330496_300.jpg

Good book (and great title for a book written by a neurosurgeon). He was guest speaker at a conference I attended. Fascinating guy.
 
Mar 16, 2009
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ScottSoCal wrote a book too. "When Beer Hits Your Brain". It turned him into a Babes on Bikes genius.
 
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