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Teams & Riders Everybody needs a little bit of Roglstomp in their lives

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Obviously this is not correct. Nearly all pro cyclocrossers go on altitude at least once during winter and they race mostly at sea level. Van Aert even does altitude in the middle of the classics season.
I would check on the camp location and who is camping there. Frequently there area other reasons for being in a remote, mountainous area if history serves us.
That said; someone training specifically for early season and low altiude races can succeed. It's not obvious at all. I was responding to two camps: one saying guys doing poorly at PN lacked altitude training while others that did altitude also didn't fare as well. It's totally individual and reliant on the rest of the training regime. Racing is still the best prep for racing, IMO. Zwifties are welcome to say otherwise.
 
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I would check on the camp location and who is camping there. Frequently there area other reasons for being in a remote, mountainous area if history serves us.
That said; someone training specifically for early season and low altiude races can succeed. It's not obvious at all. I was responding to two camps: one saying guys doing poorly at PN lacked altitude training while others that did altitude also didn't fare as well. It's totally individual and reliant on the rest of the training regime. Racing is still the best prep for racing, IMO. Zwifties are welcome to say otherwise.
You increase your red blood cell count, which transport oxygen to the muscles. That means you get a performance gain at any altitude.
 
You increase your red blood cell count, which transport oxygen to the muscles. That means you get a performance gain at any altitude.
I know how it works. I live and play from 1700 to 2500 m. Spending 2 weeks at altitude has a short life span and, if you're training for a seriously hard race you'll find you can't train as hard unless you have a month of spare time. Sleeping at altitude and riding at sea level is ideal and I'd guess most of the big riders would sleep in a room that exceeds their training elevation.
 
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That's so 2020.
It's all so 2020. I think a legit altitude regime has the rider staying in a pressurized room and training wherever they want. It's not even expensive technology and I'd heard many nordic athletes do that. Was there some outcry over that technical possibility as it was considered expensive and not in the "democratic availability" spirit of UCI rules? It works to an extent.
 
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It's all so 2020. I think a legit altitude regime has the rider staying in a pressurized room and training wherever they want. It's not even expensive technology and I'd heard many nordic athletes do that. Was there some outcry over that technical possibility as it was considered expensive and not in the "democratic availability" spirit of UCI rules? It works to an extent.
I know there have been plenty of riders who tried to sleep in an altitude tent they set up in their own room. Not really expensive, but apparently uncomfortable, making a lot of noise etc. I remember stories from a few guys of years ago, including Wellens, Campenaerts etc, but from what i remember that was not really a workable alternative. At best something to "bridge" periods for a few days. Maybe the technology has changed. But like i said before, there is the altitude hotel of Kolobnev which is popular among cyclists.
 
I know there have been plenty of riders who tried to sleep in an altitude tent they set up in their own room. Not really expensive, but apparently uncomfortable, making a lot of noise etc. I remember stories from a few guys of years ago, including Wellens, Campenaerts etc, but from what i remember that was not really a workable alternative. At best something to "bridge" periods for a few days. Maybe the technology has changed. But like i said before, there is the altitude hotel of Kolobnev which is popular among cyclists.
The altitude hotels are realistic destinations. Trying to build a room in a home isn't that difficult or necessarily expensive/noisy. It's just stuck in your home if you want to train further away. A well funded team would just work around a location like Kolobnev's (don't know anything about it) but they could also build a transportable version cheaper. A half or full-size cargo container that's segmented into rooms, sealed, insulated and pressurized could serve very well. I wouldn't be surprised if a continental team or training consultancy hasn't thought of it. Short of a pressurization feature, these type of units are used for remote construction all over the world. Or just go to the hotel or sleep at 2,500 meters like the Columbians. Then take the bus to the coast to ride.

The part that takes adjustment is just like anyone going to altitude: sleeping disruption. It takes time to acclimate enough to sleep soundly and you need more sleep time for recovery. Riders I've known that have done it is the disciplineto be regular is the hard part. Particularly when everyone else around you doesn't need or use the same conditions.
 
Roglič is in Italy right now doing a recon of the Italian stages of the Tour.

I think it's an important 'reminder' for fans & followers after Paris-Nice, i.e. the entire reason he left Jumbo in the first place is because he wants to target the Tour. It's what he's focused on.
If he was still at Visma he would probably be doing exactly the same.

I don't think his lacklustre performance at Paris-Nice is part of some deliberate plan. But don't panic, it's not like Matteo Jorgenson is suddenly a favourite to win the Tour. It's only March.
 
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His first major time donation came via the TTT. Incremental losses, as suffered by Remco were due to lack of response. He may have had "bad legs" but I seldom believe a rider suggesting he is suffering from weakness in a stage race. It's strategically a thing to lie about your form. You don't owe fans honesty until you've won or lost IMO and certainly don't provide information to opponents. The last stage he clearly wasn't going to contest and was relying on Vlasov. While he finished: he looked like he just cashed in and suffered through the cold to end the race. Nothing to contest and no need to waste energy.
He is definitely under raced and altitude camps don't help that in races largely contested below 1,500 m from my experience. No need to panic, for sure.
Don't believe them either and that's the most head-scratching thing here, Bora putting pressure on themselves by lamenting that they didn't get the result they expected instead of doing the sensible thing and telling people not to panic because the first races will be a test and it's all part of the plan.

Cue to people panicking.

German efficiency they say... smh
 
Don't believe them either and that's the most head-scratching thing here, Bora putting pressure on themselves by lamenting that they didn't get the result they expected instead of doing the sensible thing and telling people not to panic because the first races will be a test and it's all part of the plan.

Cue to people panicking.

German efficiency they say... smh
Who's panicking? Bora isn't. Roglič looks cool as always. No one cares for press or fans having mental breakdowns.