Teams & Riders Froome Talk Only

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ngent41 said:
This is just a thought I had, since I know absolutely nothing about drug interactions in people, but perhaps sky has figured out that using some combination of perfectly legal drugs like salbutamol and whatever else actually give quite a substantial boost to athletic performance?
Or, the UCI is protecting him. The guy is unencumbered by the idea hitting an inhaler looks bad. The federation is apparently silent on this issue but promised another one of their investigations into the lack of testing on Tenerife just because of something Froome posted on social media.

Or, Froome is using something just beyond detection. See the thread I just posted about doping technology.

Lots of possibilities simply because we know the UCI is not a fair dealer protecting the integrity of the sport above all.
 
bewildered said:
I can't be arsèd to post that guardian article for the third time on this thread. The one with direct quotes from sky saying he was feeling ill and under the weather, no mention of asthma. I'll take Sky's official story over that of a business journalist reporting on cycling.
Haha .. utterly laughable. What's this a new scientific methodology, ignore anything that refutes your hypothesis. Oh and it definitely does say asthma :p
 
Jul 15, 2013
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The business insider article says asthma. The guardian article with direct quotes from Sky's Dan Hunt says he was 'feeling ill' and 'under the weather'.
 
bigcog said:
I think you'll find that asthma is generally classed as an illness ...
Right, so if Sky says Froome's feeling "ill and under the weather" it's just as correct to say asthma as it is to say any other disease? Froome has AIDS. Sky said it themselves. They said he's ill and that's enough for me. :rolleyes:
 
May 19, 2011
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bewildered said:
I can't be arsèd to post that guardian article for the third time on this thread. The one with direct quotes from sky saying he was feeling ill and under the weather, no mention of asthma. I'll take Sky's official story over that of a business journalist reporting on cycling.
the same way you took USPS official statement?:eek:
 
bewildered said:
I think you'll find that he said he was feeling ill, didn't mention the word asthma or illness
Argument defense based on turn of phrase. I love it!

How come we don't see the rest of the peloton hitting the inhaler in-race? Why isn't the UCI containing this doping controversy?
 
Aug 31, 2012
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Wallace and Gromit said:
I'm not bothered what coaches predicted for Mig. History of full of people for whom great things are predicted who achieve very little. It's better to look at the characteristics of those who have achieved and spot outliers, and Mig is most definitely an outlier amongst multiple GT winners. He may be the exception that proves the rule, but I wouldn't put much money on it.
That's reasonable but what coaches say correlates with talent and shouldn't be ignored when the exercise is to decompose performance into talent and doping. A lot of athletes that are predicted to do well achieve little, as you say, but they still achieve more, on average, than those that aren't predicted to do well. There is some signal in the noise.

Generally agree with you though, and I wouldn't put much money on it either.
 
Jul 15, 2013
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bigcog said:
So he was feeling ill but didn't have an illness - that's a great predicate ...
I didn't say that did I? You were the first to mention the word illness. I only used the direct words from Dan Hunt. It's possible to feel ill or under the weather in a race without knowing the exact cause at the time or without having a specifically known illness at that time.

But not so if the rider has asthma like symptoms, has had asthma 'since he was a boy' and has undergone 'all the UCI tests' for asthma. Then you know what the problem is, you say breathing difficulties or asthma and you don't say he was 'feeling ill' or 'under the weather' imo.

And what's this nonsense you are on about saying that I am ignoring anything that 'refutes my hypothesis'. I believe the articles are in conflict with each other, you obviously think they corroborate each other.

I believe he is a rampant doper, yes, but it is not an inhaler which has turned him from zig-zagging pack-fodder into the greatest cyclist ever (if clean).

The business insider article does not quote anybody in reference to asthma, so I'd ask where the journalist got that idea? A business journalist/editor who specialises in writing about tech according to her profile.

Why didn't she quote her source or reference him/her? No other journalist I have seen mentions froome's asthma in that race and neither did Sky. That's all I'm saying.
 
Feb 22, 2014
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There are plenty of good reasons for team management/DS to avoid speaking candidly about specific conditions afflicting their riders. Privacy is one issue. Another is the same reason that J-Rod concealed his broken ribs at the Giro, and we've just discovered TJVG's fractured hip: why give opponents free information?
 

Will Carter

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May 14, 2014
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mikeoneill said:
could be a red flag moment for walsh


if froome hasn't mentioned asthma before
Why would puffing on a ventolin / salbutamol inhaler be a red flag? No TUE is needed presumably because there is no (substantial) proven performance gain.

That's like saying you think someone is a major bank robber on the basis that they picked up a pound coin someone dropped and didn't hand it back.
 
Apr 8, 2014
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Will Carter said:
Why would puffing on a ventolin / salbutamol inhaler be a red flag? No TUE is needed presumably because there is no (substantial) proven performance gain.

That's like saying you think someone is a major bank robber on the basis that they picked up a pound coin someone dropped and didn't hand it back.
A cound coin.
 
Jul 21, 2012
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Ventoux Boar said:
There are plenty of good reasons for team management/DS to avoid speaking candidly about specific conditions afflicting their riders. Privacy is one issue. Another is the same reason that J-Rod concealed his broken ribs at the Giro, and we've just discovered TJVG's fractured hip: why give opponents free information?
But sky gave everyone the secret to becoming better than Armstrong for free didnt they?
 
Jun 12, 2010
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Maybe all pro cyclist should just undergo spirometric test and provocation testing with metacholin or mannitol by an independent doctor. those who really have asthma could use the puffers. the others not. Point end. Like today everyone seems to have it.
 
Apr 20, 2014
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Alpechraxler said:
Maybe all pro cyclist should just undergo spirometric test and provocation testing with metacholin or mannitol by an independent doctor. those who really have asthma could use the puffers. the others not. Point end. Like today everyone seems to have it.
If those that have asthma can use it, why should only they get they advantage?
 
bewildered said:
I can't be arsèd to post that guardian article for the third time on this thread. The one with direct quotes from sky saying he was feeling ill and under the weather, no mention of asthma. I'll take Sky's official story over that of a business journalist reporting on cycling.
Think I go with that what was reported in a article than you opinion dude. They would have no reason just to invent asthma
 
Ventoux Boar said:
There are plenty of good reasons for team management/DS to avoid speaking candidly about specific conditions afflicting their riders. Privacy is one issue. Another is the same reason that J-Rod concealed his broken ribs at the Giro, and we've just discovered TJVG's fractured hip: why give opponents free information?
You talking about asthma?:confused:

They just gave away he had it by giving him an inhaler to use in front of the whole peloton.

I don't believe you've thought this through.
 

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