Teams & Riders Froome Talk Only

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Re: Re:

markene2 said:
wendybnt said:
Actually it was just me joking. It was pain-killer from the race doctor
Nah, im talking about from the Sky car, not the race doctor.
He was visited by the race doctor in the cool white car without treatment. 5 minutes later or so the driver of the Sky car handed him something, which he immediately swallowed. Could have been anything from a salt tablet to aspirin. It would not have been anything dodgy unless they really wanted to be caught on camera!
 
Re: Re:

ferryman said:
markene2 said:
wendybnt said:
Actually it was just me joking. It was pain-killer from the race doctor
Nah, im talking about from the Sky car, not the race doctor.
He was visited by the race doctor in the cool white car without treatment. 5 minutes later or so the driver of the Sky car handed him something, which he immediately swallowed. Could have been anything from a salt tablet to aspirin. It would not have been anything dodgy unless they really wanted to be caught on camera!
Most likely Paracetemol or Ibuprofen. Aspirin isn't always a good idea in certain circumstances ;)
 
Re: Re:

ferryman said:
markene2 said:
wendybnt said:
Actually it was just me joking. It was pain-killer from the race doctor
Nah, im talking about from the Sky car, not the race doctor.
He was visited by the race doctor in the cool white car without treatment. 5 minutes later or so the driver of the Sky car handed him something, which he immediately swallowed. Could have been anything from a salt tablet to aspirin. It would not have been anything dodgy unless they really wanted to be caught on camera!
Empty gelatin capsules from a pharmacy in Durban, recommended by his Barloworld mate.
 
Re: Re:

42x16ss said:
ferryman said:
markene2 said:
wendybnt said:
Actually it was just me joking. It was pain-killer from the race doctor
Nah, im talking about from the Sky car, not the race doctor.
He was visited by the race doctor in the cool white car without treatment. 5 minutes later or so the driver of the Sky car handed him something, which he immediately swallowed. Could have been anything from a salt tablet to aspirin. It would not have been anything dodgy unless they really wanted to be caught on camera!
Most likely Paracetemol or Ibuprofen. Aspirin isn't always a good idea in certain circumstances ;)

Aye, but I'm old school, aspirin is aspirin ;)
 
Jan 16, 2013
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Chris Froome ‏@chrisfroome
Knocked sideways into a barrier & stone wall today. Further scans in the morning but start unlikely as I can’t walk without crutches #LV2015


Knocked by what or whom, I wonder?

(I'd ignore what the BBC write nowadays - the standards are plummeting and they're more tabloidesque than anything. And increasingly wrong.)
 
Aug 26, 2014
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Re:

dottigirl said:
Chris Froome ‏@chrisfroome
Knocked sideways into a barrier & stone wall today. Further scans in the morning but start unlikely as I can’t walk without crutches #LV2015


Knocked by what or whom, I wonder?

(I'd ignore what the BBC write nowadays - the standards are plummeting and they're more tabloidesque than anything. And increasingly wrong.)
Is there any actual footage of the crash, because Ive not once heard mention of anyone else involved ?
 
Re: Re:

Electress said:
dottigirl said:
Chris Froome ‏@chrisfroome
Knocked sideways into a barrier & stone wall today. Further scans in the morning but start unlikely as I can’t walk without crutches #LV2015


Knocked by what or whom, I wonder?

(I'd ignore what the BBC write nowadays - the standards are plummeting and they're more tabloidesque than anything. And increasingly wrong.)
Is there any actual footage of the crash, because Ive not once heard mention of anyone else involved ?
That would be because Froomey is a little classier than the Shark of Messina.
 
Re: Re:

Electress said:
dottigirl said:
Chris Froome ‏@chrisfroome
Knocked sideways into a barrier & stone wall today. Further scans in the morning but start unlikely as I can’t walk without crutches #LV2015


Knocked by what or whom, I wonder?

(I'd ignore what the BBC write nowadays - the standards are plummeting and they're more tabloidesque than anything. And increasingly wrong.)
Is there any actual footage of the crash, because Ive not once heard mention of anyone else involved ?
I only saw footage of Froome getting back up. It could have been anything, someone not pointing out a pothole/obstacle, a touch of brakes or wheels, the wet road, a bottle bouncing out of a cage, or even Froome staring at his stem in a crowded bunch.
 
Mar 4, 2010
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there was no footage. only Froome picking himself up of the deck. I thought at the time it would have been very easy for someone to have nudged him over into the barrier at that point as it was on the inside of a sweeping left corner. slight nudge and he could have had his wheels in the gutter

if he was watching his srm he wouldnt have had much chance to react
 
Apr 20, 2012
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I did find it telling only two of his teammates waiting for him on that climb. Guess those tests at GSK showed he was back to being a domestique again? Anyone up for a photo?

 
Oct 16, 2010
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those are some healthy arms on that pic.
when is that, 2010? clearly wasn't having those gluten free lunch bags yet.
 
Re: Re:

TourOfSardinia said:
Bernie's eyesore said:
I'm pretty sure it was a dodgy rest day blood bag. He crashed deliberately so that it wouldn't look suspicious.
http://www.bbc.com/sport/0/cycling/34131887

BBC Sport's Matt Slater: "When you are trying to do something that only the greats have done, it is a good idea not to do something that usually only happens to dozy amateurs: crashing into a barrier, five minutes into the ride, whilst going uphill.

"Froome answered every question about his bike-handling and racing skills at the Tour de France, only to fluff an easy one he did not see coming on Wednesday.
suggests the BBC suspect Froome too.
:(
Care to explain that thought process? Talk about 2+2 = 7000....
 
Re:

TourOfSardinia said:
BBC Sport's Matt Slater suggests CF behaved as a "dozy amateur" while CF is a consummate pro.
Therefore "BBC" suspected Froome, not telling it right. Just my 2¢s.

Got it ☑ ?
Not really, no, but I'm not going to labour the point.
 
Jan 16, 2013
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Re:

TourOfSardinia said:
BBC Sport's Matt Slater suggests CF behaved as a "dozy amateur" while CF is a consummate pro.
Therefore "BBC" suspected Froome, not telling it right. Just my 2¢s.

Got it ☑ ?
The only dozy and amateurish thing happening there is the BBC Sport's Matt Slater. :rolleyes:
 
May 13, 2015
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Matt Slater doesn't care about cycling. More about the melodrama, sensational shiat like Armstrong saga and when people are going crazy on the road. He is more of a journalist than a sports fan. And a sports journalist has to be both. Even Kirby is better.
 
Steroid inhalers
Inhaled steroids usually have few or no side effects if used at normal doses. However, they can sometimes cause:

a sore mouth or throat
minor nosebleeds
difficulty speaking or a hoarse or croaky voice

A COUGH

oral thrush
 
Jul 5, 2009
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Re:

Cycle Chic said:
Steroid inhalers
Inhaled steroids usually have few or no side effects if used at normal doses. However, they can sometimes cause:

a sore mouth or throat
minor nosebleeds
difficulty speaking or a hoarse or croaky voice

A COUGH

oral thrush
I agree, but it's not the entire picture. Cortico-steroids are an HPA (Hypothalamus-Pituitary-Axis) suppressant that affects the chain from vasopressin to ACTH and ultimately adrenaline. Net result is that during a trauma your adrenal response is inhibited and that can be fatal. This suppression goes away in a few months if you're weaned off them. From what I hear, doped up cyclists going into the ER have learned to be *very* quick to confess to cortisone abuse for that reason.

Note that I've recently been studying up on inhalable steroids (particularly Fluticasone) after my 2 year old spent some time at the hospital last week with an asthma attack that couldn't be controlled with salbutamol (bronchodilator).

John Swanson
 
Re: Re:

ScienceIsCool said:
Cycle Chic said:
Steroid inhalers
Inhaled steroids usually have few or no side effects if used at normal doses. However, they can sometimes cause:

a sore mouth or throat
minor nosebleeds
difficulty speaking or a hoarse or croaky voice

A COUGH

oral thrush
I agree, but it's not the entire picture. Cortico-steroids are an HPA (Hypothalamus-Pituitary-Axis) suppressant that affects the chain from vasopressin to ACTH and ultimately adrenaline. Net result is that during a trauma your adrenal response is inhibited and that can be fatal. This suppression goes away in a few months if you're weaned off them. From what I hear, doped up cyclists going into the ER have learned to be *very* quick to confess to cortisone abuse for that reason.

Note that I've recently been studying up on inhalable steroids (particularly Fluticasone) after my 2 year old spent some time at the hospital last week with an asthma attack that couldn't be controlled with salbutamol (bronchodilator).

John Swanson
Try less milk, tends to cause the mucus build up. Or almond milk as a substitute.
 
Jul 17, 2015
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Re:

Cycle Chic said:
mucus build up from milk is well known - I wouldnt think any cyclists drink the stuff. And that point doesnt add anything to the discussion on inhaler / steroid side effects
And you think this does?:

Cycle Chic said:
Steroid inhalers
Inhaled steroids usually have few or no side effects if used at normal doses. However, they can sometimes cause:

a sore mouth or throat
minor nosebleeds
difficulty speaking or a hoarse or croaky voice

A COUGH

oral thrush
I am a cyclist. I have a cough. Does that make me a cyclist with a cough or an inhaler abuser?

Froome is a GT winner, therfore he is a doper is a far more meaningful assertion.
 

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