Junior racing - The stars of the future

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Second time in a few weeks that Le Huitouze has been able to somewhat challenge a few (former) pro's and French motorbikes from the amateur scene in a time trial.

1 GUERNALEC Victor Côtes d'Armor Marie Morin Véranda Rideau 1ère cat les 13,2 km en 16'28''121
2 SCHMIDT Fabien UC Briochine 1ère cat 16:32:201 00:04:080
3 LE HUITOUZE Eddy EC Pluvigner Junior 1 16:39:919 00:11:798
4 BOILEAU Alan VCP Loudéac 1ère cat 16:58:516 00:30:394
5 PATOUX Jérémy Côtes d'Armor Marie Morin Véranda Rideau 1ère cat 16:58:808 00:30:687
6 LE CAM Brendan UC Nantes Atlantique 1ère cat 17:01:226 00:33:105
7 D'HERVEZ Thibault Côtes d'Armor Marie Morin Véranda Rideau 1ère cat 17:09:290 00:41:168
8 LARMET Ilan Véloce vannetais Cyclisme 2 ème cat 17:12:806 00:44:685
9 COSTIOU Ewen EC Landerneau Junior 2 17:13:382 00:45:261
10 CORDELIER Matthieu OCC Cesson Junior 1 17:17:694 00:49:572
 
I suspect Czasa is a Hungarian name, rather than a German one, but that's probably not what you mean.
I don't know about Czasa, well, Brenner is half-Italian, but of course Italy is a cycling country, and in general it's eye-catching. Logic is right, sports like cycling depend on tradition and family, football is where the boys go because all the other boys do. I've just been asking myself whether there are differences between the countries.
 
Jul 31, 2019
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Is it the same in other countries, that there are hardly any juniors with migration background in cycling?
They are very rare in Belgium. And of the few I know that you could say have a migration background the other parent is as Belgian as it gets (does that actually count as migration background). Where for other sports they are often a way of integration in a community, it is not the case for cycling.
But if you look at the number of youth picking up cycling the numbers are low in general anyway. Even in Belgium...
 
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They are very rare in Belgium. And of the few I know that you could say have a migration background the other parent is as Belgian as it gets (does that actually count as migration background). Where for other sports they are often a way of integration in a community, it is not the case for cycling.
But if you look at the number of youth picking up cycling the numbers are low in general anyway. Even in Belgium...
There are a few in Italy, but I can't name any on top of my head.
Less and less kids picking up cycling is also a big factor in Italy, on top of that cycling is more of a rural area sport and you have more people with a migration background in urban areas.
On top of that cycling is not the cheapest sport to get into and in a larger country like Italy you have to travel around a lot to ride a lot. If you're a sprinter or a guy who can climb a bit and packs a decent sprint in a restricted group you won't have any problems finding races that suit you, but pure climbers or even potential TT specialists that are born in the wrong region have to travel around a lot or move to a different region (like Nibali, Aru or Caruso for example).
 
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There are a few in Italy, but I can't name any on top of my head.
Less and less kids picking up cycling is also a big factor in Italy, on top of that cycling is more of a rural area sport and you have more people with a migration background in urban areas.
On top of that cycling is not the cheapest sport to get into and in a larger country like Italy you have to travel around a lot to ride a lot. If you're a sprinter or a guy who can climb a bit and packs a decent sprint in a restricted group you won't have any problems finding races that suit you, but pure climbers or even potential TT specialists that are born in the wrong region have to travel around a lot or move to a different region (like Nibali, Aru or Caruso for example).
I wonder if the Corona-time will make more teenagers pick up cycling. Not directly road-cycling, but the trails have never been this full.
Well, my son says he wants to do the Tour de France. But only when we are on a descent. :p
 
Madis Mihkels dominated the Navardauskas Tour earlier this weekend. I'm intrigued to see what he'll bring on an international level later this year. Double European Olympic Youth champion last year Uijtdebroeks and more than once threw himself between the likes of Nommela, Laas, Rait Arm and Karpenko. A flying Estonian would be fun.
 
While Mihkels seems like the biggest talent Estonia has produced for a while I have to mention Joonas Kurits (2002) as well. He was probably the most important rider behind Veeti Vainio's victory last year at Tour de DMZ when he was riding as a guest rider with Fincycling. Strong TT'er, good sprint and frame built for classics, it'll be interesting to see him riding against better opponents later in the year. Kurits and Mihkels won three stages out of four in that Navardauskas JR-tour.

One junior rider who's been riding same races with Mihkels for the past few years said that he thinks the biggest weakness Madis currently have is his sprint. He also added that "Might get the better than Brenner and Sheffield to be honest, think he will definitely dominate next year"

That is obviously quite wild prediction given Mihkels hasn't even race a UCI-race yet, but guess we'll see. Should be nice duels incoming with Uijtdebroeks.

Lastly Leevi Kervinen (2003) from Finland who was second in Tartu Juniortour GC ahead of Mihkels and Kurits. I'd say Leevi is currently the best junior in Finland even though he's just a first year JR. Good in climbing and TT, could be a stage racer in the making. In the Finnish youth class races Kervinen has won pretty much everything, just like Hänninen did few years ago.
 
I don't know whether the information I am reading right now is correct, but if it is, Ayuso is on an absolute madness in Besaya. The level of the race ain't too high this year, but it would appear he just closed a gap of 5 minutes on his ones in a span of about 15 minutes.
 
I don't know whether the information I am reading right now is correct, but if it is, Ayuso is on an absolute madness in Besaya. The level of the race ain't too high this year, but it would appear he just closed a gap of 5 minutes on his ones in a span of about 15 minutes.
Obviously somthing is up. Either something happened in front of him or the info is off. Making up 5 minutes in 15 minutes means that if he is riding 40km/h, those guys are riding 30km/h.
 
Obviously somthing is up. Either something happened in front of him or the info is off. Making up 5 minutes in 15 minutes means that if he is riding 40km/h, those guys are riding 30km/h.
Well, he didn't win, so I'm guessing the info on his miraculous comeback were quite exaggerated. He didn't even end up winning GC. His 100% victory score this year has therefore been ended. I'm quite happy with the latter, because, while impressive, it told us zilch. It's time for him to show it on an international level, because as of right now he hasn't. Not like a Remco, Brenner or even Simmons had. Not exactly his fault either though, the Spanish cycling association don't care too much for international races. So let's hope the European Championships will go ahead.
 
To stay in junior land, yesterday there was quite an exciting battle between Mathias Vacek and Ponomar. I'm intrigued to see what they can bring to the table this year. Madis Mihkels apparently broke the course record of Majka and Kwiatkowski in a race in Poland. That kid is lethal.
 
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Milesi recently put 17 seconds into Ponomar in an ITT on the only 9.8km long Imola circuit.
Milesi is an interesting rider, last year he finished 2nd in the nc itt, ahead of Tiberi. He has a Football background and only started cycling one year earlier after an injury, so he should have lots of room to improve.
 
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