The mother of all apology speeches

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Oct 8, 2012
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How about...

I am sorry to the people that I let down. I am sorry to those that I hurt. I am moving forward. I still didn't do anything wrong.
 
Aug 2, 2010
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ebandit said:
best is.............all his expensive lawyers and what have they managed to
achieve.............................?
Mark Fabiani and Tim Herman are stunningly incompetent. It almost doesn't matter whether they were (1) stupidly loyal to the myth, or (2) just cynical bloodsuckers who knew Armstrong was going down all along.

(Mark and Tim: Which one? Stupidly loyal to the myth? Or cynical bloodsuckers?)

For all the money Armstrong has paid these two asshats, they have nothing but Lanterne Rouges to show for it.

Why would anyone in their right mind ever hire Fabiani or Herman again?
 
Mar 19, 2009
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It will be of the non-apology form. "I'm sorry you feel that way", "I'm sorry if", "I made a mistake" etc
 
Aug 7, 2010
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Page Mill Masochist said:
Mark Fabiani and Tim Herman are stunningly incompetent. It almost doesn't matter whether they were (1) stupidly loyal to the myth, or (2) just cynical bloodsuckers who knew Armstrong was going down all along.

(Mark and Tim: Which one? Stupidly loyal to the myth? Or cynical bloodsuckers?)

For all the money Armstrong has paid these two asshats, they have nothing but Lanterne Rouges to show for it.

Why would anyone in their right mind ever hire Fabiani or Herman again?
I am sure 2 years ago, Fabiani believed LA. Herman may have started to have doubts if he still believed.

Post Secret Race and USADA report, it would be hard to imagine that either was still convinced. Fabiani out of professionalism, Herman out of loyalty, continued albeit with perhaps the realization that their skills were enabling the fraud.

Yes they were paid lots, because its expensive.

As far as their failures......it must be said that they were " Polishing a turd" and no matter how good you are at what you do, a turd is a turd.

Some would say they did quite well in their manipulation of the public, which is what they were hired to do. But once the Decision was made public, their discourse became extremely bland and repetitive....Reasoned Decision is neither Reasoned or a Decision.

Tim, buddy, pack it in.

Mark, find another wealthy sociopath that needs a spin doctor. Because everybody knows you only sign up honest clients with nothing to hide.
 
Jan 29, 2010
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You know after reading this thread, I think he can go a lot further with a confession that I thought possible this morning.

As has been said, he just spouts about how he was a cyclist, it was his dream so yes he had to dope, but then he became a symbol to millions, and all his bad acts were not to preserve his image, or to win his Tours, he did it solely because he knew they needed hope, just like he did in his darkest hour.

I think given how convincing he has been in interviews saying he didn't cheat for so many years that he could pull that off, and I think it sells.

Obviously those who look closely like the clinic will never buy it as truthful, but I think the average joe on the street will lap it up, because people want to believe. Its the same reason he's lasted this long already.

I also think that the timing couldn't be better. Forgetting the legal consequences (SCA etc), this apology would not have meant as much before now, but now that he is being dropped by everyone, it will be that much more powerful.

Given that he's got no chance against SCA and the Times, he might as well go for it while he's still got the attention of the press.
 
I bet he never thought that Nike, Trek and Shack would drop him within two days.

Things have been happening very fast and he has already lost the public opinion.

His PR guys would be advising him to do whatever he can to minimize the damage to his public image.

Nothing short of a confession (at least partial) will help him to minimize the rot with the General public.

So I fully expect that if he turns up at the Livestrong event or if he doesn't at whatever public speech he makes next it would be some sort of a confession.
 
Aug 2, 2010
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WinterRider said:
I think given how convincing he has been in interviews saying he didn't cheat for so many years that he could pull that off, and I think it sells.

Obviously those who look closely like the clinic will never buy it as truthful, but I think the average joe on the street will lap it up, because people want to believe.
You're leaving out the media. The media, which bought the myth, will try to atone by chipping away at Armstrong for the rest of his life.

You're also forgetting that Armstrong has no power to intimidate. With that gone, his big media advantage is gone. He can't suppress the facts any longer. He can't suppress his teammates and critics.

Finally, I would say Armstrong is not a good liar. Without the aura, the fawning media, and the intimidation, people can take a closer look. Watch his SCA deposition. Once you accept that he is a liar, his lies are easy to see.
 
Oct 8, 2012
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Animal said:
It will be of the non-apology form. "I'm sorry you feel that way", "I'm sorry if", "I made a mistake" etc


I agree. Armstrong's apology, should there ever be one, is going to be the biggest non-apology there ever was. It's definitely going to be a "I'm sorry if I..." blah, blah, blah.

At this point I'd rather Armstrong just shut up and get his comeuppance as he more than deserves.
 
Mar 18, 2009
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I don't know if this has been pointed out on other threads, but the breaking Ferrari story could provide Lance with the perfect apology speech. Since it's about to be proven (fingers crossed, eyes aimed beseechingly upwards) that "dozens of top cyclists and whole teams" were on the Ferrari program, Lance can now admit everything and argue (with some justification) that every Euro Pro with any kind of a palmares was doped like him, that doping is as integral to the sport as shaven legs, that the greatest champion the sport had ever seen, Eddy M, introduced him to Ferrari. This could provide him with the opportunity to settle some scores (Hi Bertie!), and vent some of the anger you know is eating up his insides now. The only problem is if he does this, he'll take down Bruyneel, Ferrari and the UCI with him. On the other hand, sociopaths tend not to really be all that considerate about the feelings of others...
 
May 23, 2010
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idttywlm said:
This is a well written piece. The fact that the sponsors bolted yesterday has surely spurred team Armstrong into this debate. The trouble with the possible confession is that he'll only get the benefit of the doubt from his true believers and cancer community - no longer any love or understanding from the media.

“Bottom line: What’s my financial risk to confessing now versus confessing after the UCI strips me versus not confessing at all?”

“Confess now, earn a little goodwill, take the heat off your supporters who are having to defend you against popular opinion, facts, and common sense. Active damage control and repositioning can begin immediately. Levi and George are still getting love even within the cycling community and are being called ‘brave’ and ‘courageous.’ Confess after the UCI strips and you’ll look like a shotgun groom. Don’t confess at all and you’ll look like a sociopath. Your value will go to near-zero. You’ll be marginalized, then pushed off the board. And that last part may happen anyway.”
 
Oct 8, 2012
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Wallace said:
I don't know if this has been pointed out on other threads, but the breaking Ferrari story could provide Lance with the perfect apology speech. Since it's about to be proven (fingers crossed, eyes aimed beseechingly upwards) that "dozens of top cyclists and whole teams" were on the Ferrari program, Lance can now admit everything and argue (with some justification) that every Euro Pro with any kind of a palmares was doped like him, that doping is as integral to the sport as shaven legs, that the greatest champion the sport had ever seen, Eddy M, introduced him to Ferrari. This could provide him with the opportunity to settle some scores (Hi Bertie!), and vent some of the anger you know is eating up his insides now. The only problem is if he does this, he'll take down Bruyneel, Ferrari and the UCI with him. On the other hand, sociopaths tend not to really be all that considerate about the feelings of others...

The real risk is that Armstrong takes down his cash cow, Livestrong, in the process of a blame-others apology. All those cancer patients and people didn't donate money to Livestrong because he won the Tour de France. They donated because of the image he promoted, one of being a champion, of proving that hard work, not drugs, not cheating, but honest hard work can overcome anything. Admit doing and blame others, and well, he is just like the others. Actually, even worse, much worse.
 

Fidolix

BANNED
Jan 16, 2012
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SlowtwitchLeaks said:
I guess we'll see if Lance is a sociopath or not. A sociopath would apologize, ask for forgiveness and reinvent himself as someone on a higher ground than the rest of us.
He´s a psychopath, not a sociopath, but you are probably right about the reinvent him self part, only concern I have is, how is he gonna bring out the tears? He feel sorry for no one, no remorse, no empathy for anybody other than him self.
It´s gonna be an interesting performance, can´t wait.
 
Aug 7, 2010
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The 'blame others' apology will not fly with anyone, but his own die hards.

There is too much out there about his true character to get that hall pass.

George, Mike Barry and all the others stood by him silently and complicitly as he decided that the way to continue was to destroy anyone in the way. He was the mastermind and QB....so, no one will buy into the 'sucked into the system' defense.

And one more thing: When you chose to dope, you chose to dope. The alternative may not have kept you on the team, but there are other ways to earn a living. Harsh news, but the truth.

A long time ago when racing on the track, the first time I saw an East German up close ( I know, long time ago) I knew it was over. Bummed, but not destroyed or without choices. Too bad much of the public buys the ...'yeah, but everyone was doing it' from the die hards.
 
Page Mill Masochist said:
You're leaving out the media. The media, which bought the myth, will try to atone by chipping away at Armstrong for the rest of his life.

You're also forgetting that Armstrong has no power to intimidate. With that gone, his big media advantage is gone. He can't suppress the facts any longer. He can't suppress his teammates and critics.

Finally, I would say Armstrong is not a good liar. Without the aura, the fawning media, and the intimidation, people can take a closer look. Watch his SCA deposition. Once you accept that he is a liar, his lies are easy to see.
Bingo. He burnt the media to a crisp and used them to perpetrate the fraud (hoax), and they know that he knew he was using them. They are going to make sure he gets his appropriate place in history.

The old expression is never argue with a person who buys ink by the barrel, well Lance has done worse by humiliating and using them (and ink is no longer the media of choice, I guess you'd say in this case 'never burn someone who buys bandwidth in gbps' but that's weak.)
 
Not that I think it will happen but it will be:

“I stand before you all today, my fellow survivors, friends and family that, during my career took part in activities which, may been seen as unethical….. {long pause}….. I’m here to say {clears throat}…. That, I Lance Armstrong…. {pause}….. have… {pause} AGHGHGGH! –I CAN”T TAKE THIS ANYTMORE! NEVER TESTED POSITIVE, 500 TESTS! ALL CLEAN!!! I LIKE MY CREDIBILITY!”
 
Oct 8, 2012
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thehog said:
Not that I think it will happen but it will be:

“I stand before you all today, my fellow survivors, friends and family that, during my career took part in activities which, may been seen as unethical….. {long pause}….. I’m here to say {clears throat}…. That, I Lance Armstrong…. {pause}….. have… {pause} AGHGHGGH! –I CAN”T TAKE THIS ANYTMORE! NEVER TESTED POSITIVE, 500 TESTS! ALL CLEAN!!! I LIKE MY CREDIBILITY!”

Hahaha!!!! Good one!
 
Sep 5, 2009
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mikkemus23 said:
Will his former sponsors and USP have å legal case of getting back their money? He has å family so I think talk about suicide is a bit unfair.
USPS was funding Tailwind Sports LLC not Armstrong.

I would speculate that the timing of the flurry of media announcements by sponsors of Armstrong all on the same message indicates there were activities between the parties.

I would suggest both parties releasing each other from future litigation would have been a component of the negotiations.

SCA stumbled in their litigation cos there was no anti doping get out of jail condition in the wager agreement. It was payable if he won the TdF only.

Now that he has been stripped of those titles by USADA (but still awaiting UCI/ASO support) SCA can re-visit if the settlement and release agreement is silent on re-activation.
 
Sep 5, 2009
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Wallace said:
I don't know if this has been pointed out on other threads, but the breaking Ferrari story could provide Lance with the perfect apology speech. Since it's about to be proven (fingers crossed, eyes aimed beseechingly upwards) that "dozens of top cyclists and whole teams" were on the Ferrari program, Lance can now admit everything and argue (with some justification) that every Euro Pro with any kind of a palmares was doped like him, that doping is as integral to the sport as shaven legs, that the greatest champion the sport had ever seen, Eddy M, introduced him to Ferrari. This could provide him with the opportunity to settle some scores (Hi Bertie!), and vent some of the anger you know is eating up his insides now. The only problem is if he does this, he'll take down Bruyneel, Ferrari and the UCI with him. On the other hand, sociopaths tend not to really be all that considerate about the feelings of others...
As included in Coyle's book "Lance Armstrong's War", which was vetted and approved by LA, the arrangement between LA and Ferrari was that Ferrari could not "prepare" other GC contenders.

The book illustrates the exclusivity of this arrangement as they were constantly together except, it appears, during races.

But Armstrong could get on the two way radio and order Bruyneel to patch him into Ferrari for mid race climbing advice about the climbing speed of a competitor up the road.

Ferrari denied his fee was calculated on a percentage of income. The evidence annexed to the reasoned decision sets that denial to rest as the USPS/Discovery team riders were encouraged to consult Ferrari for preparation for a fee calculated at a percentage of their salary.

As Coyle also penned Tyler Hamilton's recent book Armstrong must be ranting:

"Et tu, Coyle?"
 

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