Website Errors.

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Susan Westemeyer said:
It's a lot easier for us to change a mistake if you tell us where it is.

Susan

Edit: It has been changed. Thank you to the user who provided the link.
well upthread there is a mistake, and its location, which hasnt been rectified.

I have to say I find the lack of accuracy and attention to detail on this site to be a source of some frustration, (this is not aimed at the quoted poster).
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Please please please

Start spelling LoFkvist and SiUtsoU correctly in race reports. You have them down as Lofkvist and Siutsou in their rider profiles, so why do you put Lovkvist and Sivtsov in race reports..
 
Mar 13, 2009
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TeamSkyFans said:
Please please please

Start spelling LoFkvist and SiUtsoU correctly in race reports. You have them down as Lofkvist and Siutsou in their rider profiles, so why do you put Lovkvist and Sivtsov in race reports..
First off - great to see you back! Did you take a hiatus?

Second off - I think there is some controversy around these two names. A quick check on wikipedia shows "Lovkvist" and many, many versions vor Siutsou/Sivtsov/Siuzou ... I remember Thierry Adam and the late great Laurent Fignon even debating about it on TV once. IINM it used to be "Siutsou" and "Sivtsov" has only appeared in the last couple of years. He first got my attention while riding on High Road with Kim Kirchen, back then it was pronounced Siutsou so that's the one I stuck with. Plus I think it sounds nicer.

For the correct spelling we should probably difer to the forum's own linguistic experts Libertine and hrotha. But I think the problem lies in the difference between the belarusian version and russian version of his name. German wikipedia tells me the russian version is Константин Сивцов, which one would indeed pronounce "Sivtsov" (I took russian in high school, can't speak it anymore but can still read cyrillic script). The belarusian version is Канстанцін Сіўцоў, which I assume is then pronounced "Siutsou".

Another interesting detail is his first name. Russian spells it KOnstanTin, although I am not quite sure about the "O", IIRC sometimes an "o" is actually pronounced "a" in Russian. The Belarusian uses an "A" and ц instead of T, so that makes for KAnstanTSin

As for Lofkvist a quick wiki search reveals his legal name is indeed spelled with an "f", here is an enternaining article in swedish:

http://www.eurosport.se/cykel/lovkvist-blir-lofkvist_sto2242560/story.shtml

When he signed his first contract with FDJ he spelled his name "Lovkvist", but in his passport it says "Lofkvist". He has often had trouble getting on planes because of it

You seem to have an in with @TeamSky, maybe you can ask them what they prefer??
 
The Belarusian "ў" is IPA [w]. Most accurately in the original Belarusian, he would be Si-w-tso-w. The Russians do not have that particular letter and so simplify to their в (IPA [v]) much as they do with other terms, eg Europe.

Many riders from Slavic countries will find their name spelled in different fashions depending on the country they are in (eg Hutarowitsch in Germany, Hutarovich in Britain, Hoetarovitsj in the Netherlands).

If we are to accept the Russified "Konstantin Sivtsov" instead of the Belarusian "Kanstantsin Siṷtsoṷ", then I insist that we should never say "Yauheni Hutarovich" either. His name is Яўген Гутаровіч in Belarusian but the Russian name is Евгений Гутарович (Evgeniy Gutarovich). But 'Yauheni' is a more accurate transcription of his forename (ў is a semivowel, not a consonant). And if we've set the precedent of spelling ў as 'u', it must follow that it is "Siutsou".

Also, the transcription of various Slavic names in standard form can be affected by where they first register. For example, Denis Menchov's name in Russian is Денис Меньшов "Denis Men'shov"; but because of registering in France, his name was transliterated as per French orthographic norms, hence the "ch", which has become accepted. In Siutsou's case, if I remember correctly, this was in Italy, which would partially influence the choice of u ahead of v.

As regards the change of [o] to [a] in Russian, this is a phenomenon called akanje. This is even more entrenched in Belarusian, because it is represented orthographically; the Russians would likely therefore pronounce his forename "Kanstantin" even though it is written "Konstantin", whereas the Belarusian spelling removes this confusion. akanje is very common in this area, with some Ukrainian dialects, Polish dialects and even the German dialects that used to exist in the area along the Baltic displaying it; Belarus is of course at the centre of these areas, and therefore it is no surprise at all to see it at its strongest there.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Libertine Seguros said:
The Belarusian "ў" is IPA [w]. Most accurately in the original Belarusian, he would be Si-w-tso-w. The Russians do not have that particular letter and so simplify to their в (IPA [v]) much as they do with other terms, eg Europe.

Many riders from Slavic countries will find their name spelled in different fashions depending on the country they are in (eg Hutarowitsch in Germany, Hutarovich in Britain, Hoetarovitsj in the Netherlands).

If we are to accept the Russified "Konstantin Sivtsov" instead of the Belarusian "Kanstantsin Siṷtsoṷ", then I insist that we should never say "Yauheni Hutarovich" either. His name is Яўген Гутаровіч in Belarusian but the Russian name is Евгений Гутарович (Evgeniy Gutarovich). But 'Yauheni' is a more accurate transcription of his forename (ў is a semivowel, not a consonant). And if we've set the precedent of spelling ў as 'u', it must follow that it is "Siutsou".

Also, the transcription of various Slavic names in standard form can be affected by where they first register. For example, Denis Menchov's name in Russian is Денис Меньшов "Denis Men'shov"; but because of registering in France, his name was transliterated as per French orthographic norms, hence the "ch", which has become accepted. In Siutsou's case, if I remember correctly, this was in Italy, which would partially influence the choice of u ahead of v.

As regards the change of [o] to [a] in Russian, this is a phenomenon called akanje. This is even more entrenched in Belarusian, because it is represented orthographically; the Russians would likely therefore pronounce his forename "Kanstantin" even though it is written "Konstantin", whereas the Belarusian spelling removes this confusion. akanje is very common in this area, with some Ukrainian dialects, Polish dialects and even the German dialects that used to exist in the area along the Baltic displaying it; Belarus is of course at the centre of these areas, and therefore it is no surprise at all to see it at its strongest there.
you really are a linguistic master.
 
Libertine Seguros said:
The Belarusian "ў" is IPA [w]. Most accurately in the original Belarusian, he would be Si-w-tso-w. The Russians do not have that particular letter and so simplify to their в (IPA [v]) much as they do with other terms, eg Europe.

Many riders from Slavic countries will find their name spelled in different fashions depending on the country they are in (eg Hutarowitsch in Germany, Hutarovich in Britain, Hoetarovitsj in the Netherlands).

If we are to accept the Russified "Konstantin Sivtsov" instead of the Belarusian "Kanstantsin Siṷtsoṷ", then I insist that we should never say "Yauheni Hutarovich" either. His name is Яўген Гутаровіч in Belarusian but the Russian name is Евгений Гутарович (Evgeniy Gutarovich). But 'Yauheni' is a more accurate transcription of his forename (ў is a semivowel, not a consonant). And if we've set the precedent of spelling ў as 'u', it must follow that it is "Siutsou".

Also, the transcription of various Slavic names in standard form can be affected by where they first register. For example, Denis Menchov's name in Russian is Денис Меньшов "Denis Men'shov"; but because of registering in France, his name was transliterated as per French orthographic norms, hence the "ch", which has become accepted. In Siutsou's case, if I remember correctly, this was in Italy, which would partially influence the choice of u ahead of v.

As regards the change of [o] to [a] in Russian, this is a phenomenon called akanje. This is even more entrenched in Belarusian, because it is represented orthographically; the Russians would likely therefore pronounce his forename "Kanstantin" even though it is written "Konstantin", whereas the Belarusian spelling removes this confusion. akanje is very common in this area, with some Ukrainian dialects, Polish dialects and even the German dialects that used to exist in the area along the Baltic displaying it; Belarus is of course at the centre of these areas, and therefore it is no surprise at all to see it at its strongest there.
So Honchar not Gonchar?

The thing with Siutsou is that the UCI has him as "Kanstantsin Sivstov". You couldn't blame people if they used this, but I guess the key is to be consistent.
 
Ferminal said:
So Honchar not Gonchar?

The thing with Siutsou is that the UCI has him as "Kanstantsin Sivstov". You couldn't blame people if they used this, but I guess the key is to be consistent.
His name in Ukrainian is Сергій Гончар.

Ukrainian has two letters like the one causing the confusion; Г is pronounced [ɦ] (like Belarusian, and unlike Russian, where it is [g]), and Ґ is pronounced [g], to solve the confusion.

So 'Serhiy Honchar' is the most phonologically accurate transliteration into English. However, the Russian version of the surname is identical to the Ukrainian (unlike with Siutsou, all of the letters in Honchar's surname exist in Russian, and furthermore Russian does not have a letter for the phoneme [ɦ] so couldn't replace it with a more accurate letter anyway), which has caused some confusion with him also being "Sergei Gonchar" and all manner of hybrid forms of the two transliterations (a bit like Kanstantsin-BLR Sivtsov-RUS as mentioned).
 
May 5, 2009
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I don't know why but I can't find the Race Reports for the 2011, 2010 or 2009 Paris Roubaix on the site. I don't know why but from Google all I come accross is the 2012 page with no reference to previous pages. Can someone post the direct links if they can find them? Thanks!
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Taiwan
http://www.cyclingnews.com/news/pollock-and-giacoppo-shake-up-world-order-in-taiwan

It was supposed to be a cakewalk for the Saxo Bank team in Taiwan. Arriving for the 2.1 rated Tour, the team were chasing a very utilitarian goal; WorldTour points. Facing a major deficit after former team captain Alberto Contador's points were disqualified by the CAS in February, the Tour de Taiwan is among many races added to Saxo Banks's calendar to bolster their 2012 tally.
There arent any world tour points available in Taiwan
 
May 26, 2010
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Julian Dean who crashed after 10kms rides for greenedge not Garmin as reported in the Volta a Catalunya stage 3 report.
 
Oct 18, 2009
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Hi,

You said in theMattia Gavazzi article that he's not related to Francesco Gavazzi from Lampre. But Francesco has moved to Astana this year.

"Mattia is the son of Pierino Gavazzi, who won Milan-San Remo in 1980 and five Giro d'Italia stages. He is not related to Francesco Gavazzi of Lampre."

Thanks
 
Susan Westemeyer said:
I found a typo in that story, too, so I will make those changes.

Thanks.

Susan
How many days does the 3 days de panne take place over?

http://www.cyclingnews.com/news/chavanel-heads-omega-pharma-quickstep-at-three-days-of-de-panne

Omega Pharma-QuickStep are also sending Michal Kwiatkowski and Francesco Chicchi to the event, which takes place over two days. "As always, it's going to be a difficult race with tense stages and lots of athletes vying to stand out," explained directeur sportif Tom Steels.
I know race names can't always be trusted but this time it is accurate.
 
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