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Wiggins, Clinic respect?

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May 26, 2010
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Re:

samhocking said:
I'm talking about the bike industry. Those are simply the 3 main road manufactures in US who boomed due to Lance Effect. They all attribute their growth to that effect.

I would hazard a guess that if not Armstrong then maybe another USA rider would have won a TdF, Vaughters, Jullich, Hamilton et al and then Landis. So the bike industry in USA was going to grow based on the sport wanting to grow in that market place.

ASO and the French Tourist industry were definitely looking abroad. Not hard to see that the TdF is the biggest advert every year and recieves huge backing from the French government.

Maybe this is why they are not othered to have a French winner the last 30 years. Not good for tourism and the money that brings in.

I wonder how what the numbers are from the UK since Sky were set up.....
 
Re: Re:

Benotti69 said:
samhocking said:
I'm talking about the bike industry. Those are simply the 3 main road manufactures in US who boomed due to Lance Effect. They all attribute their growth to that effect.

I would hazard a guess that if not Armstrong then maybe another USA rider would have won a TdF, Vaughters, Jullich, Hamilton et al and then Landis. So the bike industry in USA was going to grow based on the sport wanting to grow in that market place.

ASO and the French Tourist industry were definitely looking abroad. Not hard to see that the TdF is the biggest advert every year and recieves huge backing from the French government.

Maybe this is why they are not othered to have a French winner the last 30 years. Not good for tourism and the money that brings in.

I wonder how what the numbers are from the UK since Sky were set up.....


Truth be told it was the internet that helped US cycling grow. From 1995 onwards and towards the Lance years access to races and equipment was freely available online for the first time. It was the beginning of globalisation for many industries not just cycling.
 
I'll believe what the industry says thanks. It helped, but like UK Cycle Industry booming after Wiggins-effect, it had nothing to do with the internet, it's to do with athletes transcending the sport, to the point man on the street can identify with the sport and takes it up themselves.
 
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samhocking said:
I'll believe what the industry says thanks. It helped, but like UK Cycle Industry booming after Wiggins-effect, it had nothing to do with the internet, it's to do with athletes transcending the sport, to the point man on the street can identify with the sport and takes it up themselves.

That’s because the internet had been around for a long time in 2012, with Lance it was just taking off along with the globalization of the world economy.

Do you think about what you write? Or voice input? :cool:
 
The Internet doesn't explain a sportsman transcending the sport, the internet doesn't explain the boom in UK or US It enables sales with cheaper overheads, it didn't generate sales or desire to get on a bike, write about or appear on front cover of time magazine. Sports men and women have to do that and to change the status quo, they need to be bigger than the sport was before, because cycling is a minority sport the man on the street cannot identify with otherwise.
 
Re: Re:

Benotti69 said:
samhocking said:
I'm talking about the bike industry. Those are simply the 3 main road manufactures in US who boomed due to Lance Effect. They all attribute their growth to that effect.

I would hazard a guess that if not Armstrong then maybe another USA rider would have won a TdF, Vaughters, Jullich, Hamilton et al and then Landis. So the bike industry in USA was going to grow based on the sport wanting to grow in that market place.

ASO and the French Tourist industry were definitely looking abroad. Not hard to see that the TdF is the biggest advert every year and recieves huge backing from the French government.

Maybe this is why they are not othered to have a French winner the last 30 years. Not good for tourism and the money that brings in.

I wonder how what the numbers are from the UK since Sky were set up.....

It wasn't that LA won a TdF, it was that he won SEVEN in a row as a cancer survivor on a team branded US Postal Service. LeMond won 3, and the sport didn't grow in the US. The global attention (and money) that cycling received because of that was huge.

You can see the same effect in Britain on a slightly smaller scale with Sky (aided by the British track team).

Cycling is dining out on the backs of Armstrong and Chris Froome. That's why the omerta remains strong. Everyone's eating at the same trough.
 
Re:

samhocking said:
The Internet doesn't explain a sportsman transcending the sport, the internet doesn't explain the boom in UK or US It enables sales with cheaper overheads, it didn't generate sales or desire to get on a bike, write about or appear on front cover of time magazine. Sports men and women have to do that and to change the status quo, they need to be bigger than the sport was before, because cycling is a minority sport the man on the street cannot identify with otherwise.
If that was so why aren't the bigger-than-that-sport champs there in the Tour de Yorkshire
selling the dream to the man on the street ready to by their kit?
Wiggins appeared once and was a Joke. Froome???
 
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TourOfSardinia said:
samhocking said:
The Internet doesn't explain a sportsman transcending the sport, the internet doesn't explain the boom in UK or US It enables sales with cheaper overheads, it didn't generate sales or desire to get on a bike, write about or appear on front cover of time magazine. Sports men and women have to do that and to change the status quo, they need to be bigger than the sport was before, because cycling is a minority sport the man on the street cannot identify with otherwise.
If that was so why aren't the bigger-than-that-sport champs there in the Tour de Yorkshire
selling the dream to the man on the street ready to by their kit?
Wiggins appeared once and was a Joke. Froome???

Tour de Yorkshire lol? I don't think you qiote grasp what transcending something is perhaps. Transcending is 'surpassing' something. e.g. Armstrong surpassing 5 Tour wins. Either way, it doesn't happen in cycling via the TdeY lol! This is why the French all of a sudden are doing all they can to stop Froome winning his 5th. He's on the verge of transcending their French hero's, it's only natural.
 
Re:

samhocking said:
The Internet doesn't explain a sportsman transcending the sport, the internet doesn't explain the boom in UK or US It enables sales with cheaper overheads, it didn't generate sales or desire to get on a bike, write about or appear on front cover of time magazine. Sports men and women have to do that and to change the status quo, they need to be bigger than the sport was before, because cycling is a minority sport the man on the street cannot identify with otherwise.

You’re right Sam, the Internet wasn’t very big. Nor as the expansion of the global economy due to the deregulation of several industries including the banking industry freeing up untold amounts of capital for businesses to loan and increase their size.

You may have missed all this when working in your local bike shop :cool:
 
Re:

samhocking said:
I worked for Kitchings thanks not a bike shop. Well I did initially. I was shop and team mechanic and we sold crap loads of Oakley sunglasses and Time Eqiupe Shoes and Pedals off LeMonds 89 Tour win. Happy days!

That would be Time “Equipe” shoes. Oakley didn’t take off till about 1995 (beginning of the Internet or WWW I should say), when they went IPO. It was the UK and European sales which almost took the company down in 1997.

History should be looked from a global perspective rather than a local bike shop but glad you had fun :cool:
 
Keep up Hog. I was racing bikes and selling his kit in 1989. It was a fantastic time to be involved in bike racing I can remember what any rider wore and rode in that time because fans came into the shop asking to buy what riders were racing what stuff.

Everything you need to know that sold in huge numbers in 1989 and onwards is in this photo. Oakely Razors, Time Equipe Shoes, Time Equipe Pro Magnesium Pedals, Giro helmets and thousands of ADR jerseys too.

1989.jpg
 
Re:

macbindle said:
Yeah, because people always buy the jersey that their favourite rider isn't wearing :p :lol:

As we all remember, in 1989 LeMond won jack *** all year and was half racing for the US Coors team spending little time in Europe. Only by the Tour in July did he magically flourish signing ith Z by the Worlds where he was wearing the US Jersey.

Sams “thousands” claim on ADR jersey is most likely embellished like most of his posts.
 
I'm obviously exaggerating, they sold far more than other team jersey by several times though on the mail order side that year. Obviously Colin Sturgess was riding with ADR, so that helped. Probably wasn't far off 1000 sales though. Z sold crazy too and Oakley Mumbo range went loopy too with LeMond at Z.
 
Re:

samhocking said:
I'm obviously exaggerating, they sold far more than other team jersey by several times though on the mail order side that year. Obviously Colin Sturgess was riding with ADR, so that helped. Probably wasn't far off 1000 sales though. Z sold crazy too and Oakley Mumbo range went loopy too with LeMond at Z.
And this is related to Wiggins
How?
 
We're talking about riders transcending their sport and a bicycle industry flourishing from/because of that. i.e. look at cycling in UK pre and post TeamGB/Wiggins Tour de France success. Just looking at all the sky jerseys cycling around London is always is a bit of a surprise when I go up for work and stuff, you realise what a huge effect he had and obviously now Froome too to a lesser extent.
 
Re:

samhocking said:
I'm obviously exaggerating, they sold far more than other team jersey by several times though on the mail order side that year. Obviously Colin Sturgess was riding with ADR, so that helped. Probably wasn't far off 1000 sales though. Z sold crazy too and Oakley Mumbo range went loopy too with LeMond at Z.

Yes, we know you exaggerate, a lot.
 
Exaggerating numbers doesn't change the premise of what I am discussing. We sold far more ADR jerseys than any other pro teams because of LeMonde's win, it was that simple. We sold Time shoes and pedals precisely because of LeMondes win. Before that, there wasn't any disproportionate demand for Time by customers. Just go back to pictures in the comic pre and post LeMond'es 1989 win and you'll see the influence he had on what amateur racers were wearing and their purchase decisions influenced. It was the same for Trek, during Armstrong's wins. Man off the street were not buying Pinarellos because Ullrich came second, man on the street's new bike decision was influenced by what they saw Armstrong riding and sponsored by. Simple as, basic sponsorship marketing in full-effect.
 
Re:

samhocking said:
Exaggerating numbers doesn't change the premise of what I am discussing. We sold far more ADR jerseys than any other pro teams because of LeMonde's win, it was that simple. We sold Time shoes and pedals precisely because of LeMondes win. Before that, there wasn't any disproportionate demand for Time by customers. Just go back to pictures in the comic pre and post LeMond'es 1989 win and you'll see the influence he had on what amateur racers were wearing and their purchase decisions influenced. It was the same for Trek, during Armstrong's wins. Man off the street were not buying Pinarellos because Ullrich came second, man on the street's new bike decision was influenced by what they saw Armstrong riding and sponsored by. Simple as, basic sponsorship marketing in full-effect.

Yes Sam, I’m sure it was all true :p
 

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