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Ows protesters broken up at Zuccotti Park, NY, on court mandate for "heigenic" reasons.

It has recently become known that some private businesses have recruited law enforcement and mobilized them as their hired henchmen, such as JPMorgan Chase, which made a donation of $4.6 million to the NY Police Foundation.

We live in a society, in short, in which anything can be bought and everything is rigged in favor of the "coporatocracy." Basically this means entire governments and legislatures have been sold to the highest bidders that has transformed democracy into a colossal business enterprise, in which everything is bargained for and everyone gets defrauded. That's the truth.

The NY episode is followed by the recent one in Oakland, in which the police surrounded the protesters and fired upon them with rubber pellets (which can be lethal) and tear gas.

This of course means that the same corporatocracy is terrified of the consequences that a shattering protest movement, in short democracy on the streets, may have for their private business interests and that, as with all autocratic regimes, it will take recourse to repression whenever its abundant financial resources can bring the necessary pressure to bear and transform the state's courts and law enforcement into direct agents of their perverse plans to bring the American people, and hence the American state, into total submission.

In most situations in which the police and the courts become the strong-arms of an unelected power that rules over society, we call this fascism.

This is why I'm always rather diffident and unobliging to the police, military and paramilitary forces, because for me they do not represent liberty and justice, but arrogance and prepotency, while in most cases the people who choose to pursue a career in these fields that I have ever known, are either open fascists in their world views or closet ones, who hide their fascist tendencies behind the unsupportable hypocritical facade of defending the weak and civil society against the forces of crime and tyranny. And the corruption of law enforcement, just look at the NYPD planting drugs on their innocent victims, simply to meet arrest quotas, etc., is naturally appalling and grotesque.
 
May 6, 2009
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How on earth is a company allowed to make donations to the police force, and how is that any different just to bribing the police to do whatever you like? Over here you would have no idea how much flak police have copped because a few off-duty police offers accepted a half priced drink at a nightclub or a burger at McDonald's.
 
Looks as if the republican presidential candidates would be wise to not open their mouths, which is pretty much what the vacuous Romney has done in not taking a real position on anything except opposing Obama's healthcare proposal, even if it is a photocopy of the one he proposed for his state while the governor.

The only thing that seems to unify this Gang of Eight, like the 7 Dwarfs + 1, is their stupidity and gratuitous anti-obamaism.

Added to the the long list of intellectual deficiencies; from Perry forgetting during a debate the third ministry he intends to abolish if elected (a strategy so congenial to the anti-state right wing) - only to be prompted by Romney with the Environmental Agency he accepted, even if that's not a ministry - to Palin stating that North Korea was "an ally;" to the extremist Bachmann's opinion that growing up during the slave era "was better": is the ex-king of "Godfather Pizza" Herman Cain, apart from his having been accused by four women of sexual harassment, looking like when asked to discuss Libya and Obama's strategy there to defeat Gaddafi, as if he hardly seemed to remember where the country was on the map. Cain then launched a rather confused and inane assessment of the Libyan tribal situation and the delicate and hazardous push toward democratic institutions, finally to state that he "didn't know" if he would have pursued the same mission as Obama. In the end when asked if he knew who the president of Uzbekistan was, Cain had to confess his ignorance, which is excusable in itself, if it were not that he stuttered to pronounce the country, "Ubebe...unbe...unbezki...": before finally spitting the correct pronunciation out, Uzbekistan.

Republican candidates such as these, and particularly the Texan Cain, have led the satirists and TV comedians to sarcastically bemoan the absence of George Bush's intelligence and preparation for the job.

Just the thought that one of these eight could be executive chief of the worlds number 1 (for now) economy, its most potent military force, greatest nuclear arsenal, is enough to give Obama renewed hope.
 
Jun 22, 2009
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FAO Mod/Admin
This should have gone into the election topic - can you move or should I re-post?


The interview about Libya was truly cringeworthy. I think these 'candidates' should be collectively referred to as the Republitards.

When Texas Gov. Rick Perry entered the Republican presidential race in mid-August, he was touted as the candidate conservatives had been waiting for — the antidote to the more country club sort of appeal of former Massachusetts governor Mitt Romney.

No longer.
Three months into his campaign, a new Washington Post-ABC News survey reveals that his numbers have not only fallen considerably among self-identified conservative Republicans, but also lag behind Romney and the majority of the other candidates for the GOP nomination.

Among all Republicans, 42 percent view Perry favorably while 38 percent see him in an unfavorable light. Perry’s unfavorable ratings have been ticking rapidly upwards — from 11 percent in September and 24 percent in October — a sign that the more the party gets to know him, the less they like him.

But the trouble for Perry is even more apparent when you drill down to only those who call themselves conservative Republicans — the people who tend to have outsized influence in picking the party’s presidential nominee.

In that subgroup, 47 percent view Perry favorably while 39 percent regarded him unfavorably. That’s compared to a 55 percent-26 percent split for Perry in the October Post-ABC poll and a 55 percent-7 percent split in September.

Perry struggles not only in comparison to his own past standing in the polls but also when matched up against his Republican rivals.

Businessman Herman Cain has trudged through a series of sexual harassment charges in recent weeks but retained a 54 percent favorable rating and a 34 percent unfavorable rating in the latest Post-ABC poll among conservative Republicans.

Former House Speaker Newt Gingrich had a stellar 65 percent favorable and 19 percent unfavorable among conservative Republicans in the November Post-ABC poll, while Rep. Michele Bachmann (R-Minn.) had a 66 percent favorable and 13 percent unfavorable in a late September survey.

Even Romney — 60 percent favorable/25 percent unfavorable in an October poll — performed far better among conservative GOPers than Perry.

These poll numbers paint a grim picture for Perry as he and his team try to find a path back to relevance after his now famous/infamous “oops” moment in a debate in Michigan last week.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/the-fix/post/rick-perry-conservative-hero-no-longer/2011/11/15/gIQA5DziPN_blog.html


Damn, there goes my dream ticket down the tubes.
 
May 13, 2009
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Amsterhammer said:
There should be a few more of those polls:

Which is seen more favorable, Congress or:

10) Telemarketers
9) The NBA season so far
8) Kim Kardashians wedding vows
7) The sound of scraping nails across a blackboard
6) Greece's sovereign debt
5) Real estate near Fukushima
4) An actual turd sandwich
3) Gaddafi
2) Being Gaddafi'ed
1) Sandusky
 
Jul 4, 2009
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...youse guys...and you know who you are...may find this interesting...

When public opinion on the big social and political issues changes, the trends tend to be relatively gradual. Abrupt shifts, when they come, are usually precipitated by dramatic events. Which is why pollsters are so surprised by what has happened to perceptions about climate change over a span of just four years. A 2007 Harris poll found that 71 percent of Americans believed that the continued burning of fossil fuels would cause the climate to change. By 2009 the figure had dropped to 51 percent. In June 2011 the number of Americans who agreed was down to 44 percent—well under half the population. According to Scott Keeter, director of survey research at the Pew Research Center for People and the Press, this is “among the largest shifts over a short period of time seen in recent public opinion history.”

Even more striking, this shift has occurred almost entirely at one end of the political spectrum. As recently as 2008 (the year Newt Gingrich did a climate change TV spot with Nancy Pelosi) the issue still had a veneer of bipartisan support in the United States. Those days are decidedly over. Today, 70–75 percent of self-identified Democrats and liberals believe humans are changing the climate—a level that has remained stable or risen slightly over the past decade. In sharp contrast, Republicans, particularly Tea Party members, have overwhelmingly chosen to reject the scientific consensus. In some regions, only about 20 percent of self-identified Republicans accept the science.

Equally significant has been a shift in emotional intensity. Climate change used to be something most everyone said they cared about—just not all that much. When Americans were asked to rank their political concerns in order of priority, climate change would reliably come in last.

But now there is a significant cohort of Republicans who care passionately, even obsessively, about climate change—though what they care about is exposing it as a “hoax” being perpetrated by liberals to force them to change their light bulbs, live in Soviet-style tenements and surrender their SUVs. For these right-wingers, opposition to climate change has become as central to their worldview as low taxes, gun ownership and opposition to abortion. Many climate scientists report receiving death threats, as do authors of articles on subjects as seemingly innocuous as energy conservation. (As one letter writer put it to Stan Cox, author of a book critical of air-conditioning, “You can pry my thermostat out of my cold dead hands.”)

....from...http://www.thenation.com/article/164497/capitalism-vs-climate?page=0,0

...and it also contains this little ditty about the ditto heads who are the foot soldiers in this ideological war ( aka...those guys...useful idiots...etc...etc...)...

This is the true purpose of the gathering: providing a forum for die-hard denialists to collect the rhetorical baseball bats with which they will club environmentalists and climate scientists in the weeks and months to come. The talking points first tested here will jam the comment sections beneath every article and YouTube video that contains the phrase “climate change” or “global warming.” They will also exit the mouths of hundreds of right-wing commentators and politicians—from Republican presidential candidates like Rick Perry and Michele Bachmann all the way down to county commissioners like Richard Rothschild. In an interview outside the sessions, Joseph Bast, president of the Heartland Institute, proudly takes credit for “thousands of articles and op-eds and speeches…that were informed by or motivated by somebody attending one of these conferences.”

Cheers

blutto
 
Jun 16, 2009
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craig1985 said:
Obama is in town and now that is the only thing on the news with live coverage (and commerical free) of his press conference. On Monday his 200 secret service goons, and the 13 car Presidential cavalcade arrived in the country.
His speech seemed to be directed at China trying to make them feel happy about the new naval base in NT. Supposedly the amount of planes and jets flying around Canberra at the moment is really annoying. Even the American secret service kicked out the Australian Federal Police for this event.
 
Jun 16, 2009
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blutto said:
[snip]

Even more striking, this shift has occurred almost entirely at one end of the political spectrum. As recently as 2008 (the year Newt Gingrich did a climate change TV spot with Nancy Pelosi) the issue still had a veneer of bipartisan support in the United States. Those days are decidedly over. Today, 70–75 percent of self-identified Democrats and liberals believe humans are changing the climate—a level that has remained stable or risen slightly over the past decade. In sharp contrast, Republicans, particularly Tea Party members, have overwhelmingly chosen to reject the scientific consensus. In some regions, only about 20 percent of self-identified Republicans accept the science.

Equally significant has been a shift in emotional intensity. Climate change used to be something most everyone said they cared about—just not all that much. When Americans were asked to rank their political concerns in order of priority, climate change would reliably come in last.

But now there is a significant cohort of Republicans who care passionately, even obsessively, about climate change—though what they care about is exposing it as a “hoax” being perpetrated by liberals to force them to change their light bulbs, live in Soviet-style tenements and surrender their SUVs. For these right-wingers, opposition to climate change has become as central to their worldview as low taxes, gun ownership and opposition to abortion. Many climate scientists report receiving death threats, as do authors of articles on subjects as seemingly innocuous as energy conservation. (As one letter writer put it to Stan Cox, author of a book critical of air-conditioning, “You can pry my thermostat out of my cold dead hands.”)

....from...http://www.thenation.com/article/164497/capitalism-vs-climate?page=0,0

...and it also contains this little ditty about the ditto heads who are the foot soldiers in this ideological war ( aka...those guys...useful idiots...etc...etc...)...

This is the true purpose of the gathering: providing a forum for die-hard denialists to collect the rhetorical baseball bats with which they will club environmentalists and climate scientists in the weeks and months to come. The talking points first tested here will jam the comment sections beneath every article and YouTube video that contains the phrase “climate change” or “global warming.” They will also exit the mouths of hundreds of right-wing commentators and politicians—from Republican presidential candidates like Rick Perry and Michele Bachmann all the way down to county commissioners like Richard Rothschild. In an interview outside the sessions, Joseph Bast, president of the Heartland Institute, proudly takes credit for “thousands of articles and op-eds and speeches…that were informed by or motivated by somebody attending one of these conferences.”

Cheers

blutto
The reason why more conservative politicians are becoming more inclined to support anthropogenic climate change is also to do with the banks they are connected. Even in Australia, conservative politicians such as Joe Hockey, Malcolm Turnbull and even past leaders like John Hewson have become very supportive of making 'green' changes are due to their links with Banks that they were or still are apart of or that they are shareholders in. Their belief in it comes from their back pockets.

Also, I don't think it is just the "die-hard denialists" that are running around with baseball bats. Many people who agree with anthropogenic climate change also follow it religiously. Come into universities and school and listen to how the lecturers or teachers who are 'die hard supporters' and don't want to hear an opposing view to their's. Personally I think the opposite is happening in Australia in comparison to what you are saying Americans attitude is. Australian's are definetly becoming more 'pro-climate change' and becoming more 'green' and I guess it is more economically possible to do it in Australia with our relatively strong economy compared to America which is down in the 'craphole' regarding their economic status.
 
I'm actually surprised that Congress ratings are that high. If you took everyone who is on the government dole out, the ratings would probably be close to 0%. Then again, considering that the number of "unsure" is 8%, and the margin of error, it is indeed rock bottom.

But is anyone really surprised?
 
May 6, 2009
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auscyclefan94 said:
His speech seemed to be directed at China trying to make them feel happy about the new naval base in NT. Supposedly the amount of planes and jets flying around Canberra at the moment is really annoying. Even the American secret service kicked out the Australian Federal Police for this event.
I remember the stunt that Chaser's pulled at APEC when Bush Jnr came in '07:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TdnAaQ0n5-8

I think they stopped from going too far because they're worried that the Secret Service would probably shot them.
 
May 6, 2009
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auscyclefan94 said:
Another reason to not want the APEC summit in Melbourne again. The amount of protests and tight security for all the leaders was crazy.
When Obama was originally meant to visit, it was during the AFL season and they were talking about him going to a game, which would have been **** for the normal fans, the increased security checks, secret service goons etc.
 
Mar 10, 2009
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I wonder why this piece of legislation hasn't been brought to the floor yet, or better even discussed in committee:

Stop Trading on Congressional Knowledge Act
HR1148
Introduced in March, 46 cosponsors (1 GOPer from the looks of it), just sitting there, referred to the Judiciary committee.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Alpe d'Huez said:
That doesn't mean what Fox broadcast is beyond criticism or should be taken as fact.
I think Fox should absolutely be criticized on many levels. I believe you are aware that Fox gets blasted on this thread routinely. I would be more impressed with the criticism if other news organizations received similar scrutiny.

It's ironic that the poster used an organization rife with mistakes and retractions to point out a mistake at Fox and that was the point.
 
Apr 20, 2009
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Scott SoCal said:
I think Fox should absolutely be criticized on many levels. I believe you are aware that Fox gets blasted on this thread routinely. I would be more impressed with the criticism if other news organizations received similar scrutiny.

It's ironic that the poster used an organization rife with mistakes and retractions to point out a mistake at Fox and that was the point.
i have never watched fox that i know of. nor msnbc. although i have seen clips from them on the net.

i have watched cnn, though. i do not know if it is exemplary of american news, but if it is, god help you all. it is the biggest pile of crap that i have ever seen trying to pass itself of as news. i don't know how often they make mistakes, but it hardly matters when so little of what they do is report news. some of the news hosts do not seem to have any functioning brain cells and certainly do not understand what journalism and reporting are.

it makes me angry to even think about it.
 
Jul 4, 2011
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gregod said:
i have never watched fox that i know of. nor msnbc. although i have seen clips from them on the net.

i have watched cnn, though. i do not know if it is exemplary of american news, but if it is, god help you all. it is the biggest pile of crap that i have ever seen trying to pass itself of as news. i don't know how often they make mistakes, but it hardly matters when so little of what they do is report news. some of the news hosts do not seem to have any functioning brain cells and certainly do not understand what journalism and reporting are.

it makes me angry to even think about it.
You're not American? For some reason, I always thought you were one.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
gregod said:
i have never watched fox that i know of. nor msnbc. although i have seen clips from them on the net.

i have watched cnn, though. i do not know if it is exemplary of american news, but if it is, god help you all. it is the biggest pile of crap that i have ever seen trying to pass itself of as news. i don't know how often they make mistakes, but it hardly matters when so little of what they do is report news. some of the news hosts do not seem to have any functioning brain cells and certainly do not understand what journalism and reporting are.

it makes me angry to even think about it.

I don't watch a lot of TV but I think your point is a valid one. News here is really more entertainment than anything.

As far as US Politics there are a few outlets in the UK that I feel are better and more informative (particularly investigative) than anything I know of in the US.
 
Jul 4, 2009
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Scott SoCal said:
I think Fox should absolutely be criticized on many levels. I believe you are aware that Fox gets blasted on this thread routinely. I would be more impressed with the criticism if other news organizations received similar scrutiny.

It's ironic that the poster used an organization rife with mistakes and retractions to point out a mistake at Fox and that was the point.
....here is a bit of a hint....because they don't deserve similar scutiny....

...and in a related matter I would be more impressed with you if you actually put your considerable grey matter into doing some real critical thinking instead of regurgitating lightweight political pablum from the most braindead of sources...because right now you are just a sad waste of resources...because you could be great and have the admiration of everyone on this thread....now wouldn't that be great!...


Cheers

blutto
 
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