The pedaling technique thread

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Jun 4, 2015
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twothirds said:
An interesting read about elliptical chainrings (and how it relates to efficiency and technique)

http://trstriathlon.com/elliptical-chain-rings-dont-work-because-you-wont-let-them/
"In other words, the cyclists adapted their leg motion to the chain ring shape so that they could continue pedaling the way they’re used to. And because they kept pedaling the way they always do, they produced the same power they always do."
That partly explains why the rotor crank idea was a failure.
 
Jun 1, 2014
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JamesCun said:
backdoor said:
Well that sounds like an interesting study of you want to pedal with no resistance. Not sure why they would care about 50watt efforts?

How does it relate to this thread?
Still curious how you feel this is relevant to your religion/cause/obsessions? Care to explain how this study could impact our thinking about pedalling technique?
 
Apr 21, 2009
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Delusions because Noel's only validation of his claims are his imagination.

Very easy to estimate the effects of his claims. But such a reluctance to do so :rolleyes:
 
Jun 18, 2015
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To children who believe in Santa Claus, every bell sounds like Sleigh Bells.
I know a woman who truly believes she interacts with angels. Really.
Belief is powerful
Cheers,
The Grinch
 
Apr 21, 2009
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PhitBoy said:
To children who believe in Santa Claus, every bell sounds like Sleigh Bells.
I know a woman who truly believes she interacts with angels. Really.
Belief is powerful
Cheers,
The Grinch
Grinch is this guy???

Dr. Jim Martin, a renowned professor of exercise and sport science who has published numerous studies on cycling kinematics.
 
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Captain Serious said:
...
What do you think about his comments regarding hip rocking when riding aero?

About 2 mins in:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WKFTIaUXSoc
--------------------------------------------------
and perhaps with consideration of 'crankarm length' as an aspect of 'fit' specifically for the aero position.
There is a separate thread about 'crankarm length' ...

I don't think the comments in the video were specifically about 'hip rocking' (as in up-and-down) - but more about an inefficient 'off-axis' hip/leg movement that occured because of the low position.

Jay Kosta
Endwell NY USA
 
Oct 10, 2015
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backdoor said:
CoachFergie said:
Coyle 1991 demonstrates perfectly that experienced cat 1 cyclists pedal less effectively than cat 2 cyclists but generate more power in a 40km TT. That their great efficiency is due to more training and development of type 1 fibers.
what prevents those cat 2 cyclists from doing more training and development of type 1 fibres?
Was this ever addressed?

I'm confused by the notion of cat 1s pedaling less effectively than cat 2s.
 
Sep 30, 2009
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The Cat 2's are maximizing their genetic potential, the Cat 1's have better genetics allowing them to overcome "less effective" pedaling
 
Oct 10, 2015
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twothirds said:
The Cat 2's are maximizing their genetic potential, the Cat 1's have better genetics allowing them to overcome "less effective" pedaling
On the surface, this makes no sense to me.

This seems to suggest that Cat 1's have some sort of predisposition to pedal less effectively, but somehow were pedaling more effectively when they, themselves were Cat 2's. :confused:

I'm not trying to be difficult here, I'm just not following the logic.

And how was any of this supposedly detected to begin with?
 
Perhaps the cat 2s were trying harder in an attempt to challenge the cat 1s, and that affected the cat 2s technique.
Or the cat 1s were taking it a little easy, which resulted in lower efficiency.

There's no way to determine if everyone was 'trying' equally hard, or even if they were trying to use their 'best technique'..

Jay Kosta
Endwell NY USA
 
Jun 4, 2015
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Jacques de Molay said:
twothirds said:
The Cat 2's are maximizing their genetic potential, the Cat 1's have better genetics allowing them to overcome "less effective" pedaling
On the surface, this makes no sense to me.

This seems to suggest that Cat 1's have some sort of predisposition to pedal less effectively, but somehow were pedaling more effectively when they, themselves were Cat 2's. :confused:

I'm not trying to be difficult here, I'm just not following the logic.

And how was any of this supposedly detected to begin with?
This is probably the research, http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1997818, and the words ' more or less effectively ' do not appear in the abstract.
 
Jun 4, 2015
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CoachFergie said:
Sprinters use narrow bars simply for aerodynamic advantage. Not to follow some unproven pedalling technique.
The question arises, which bars are better in TT's for aerodynamic purposes, I would say these narrow bars. I have been using bars of between 20-23 cms for over 25 years and had a letter published in this same "Cycling Weekly" magazine describing these aerodynamic advantages over 20 years ago. But for these narrow bars I would never have discovered the perfect pedalling technique which delivers max torque through TDC and eliminates the root cause of cycling's lower back pain.
 
Jun 1, 2014
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backdoor said:
CoachFergie said:
Sprinters use narrow bars simply for aerodynamic advantage. Not to follow some unproven pedalling technique.
The question arises, which bars are better in TT's for aerodynamic purposes, I would say these narrow bars. I have been using bars of between 20-23 cms for over 25 years and had a letter published in this same "Cycling Weekly" magazine describing these aerodynamic advantages over 20 years ago. But for these narrow bars I would never have discovered the perfect pedalling technique which delivers max torque through TDC and eliminates the root cause of cycling's lower back pain.
And how do narrow bars enable this magical technique? I think we would all love to see the diagrams, video, power and muscle activity data to support your claims.

And well done on the 2 year old quote you dig up!!
 
Jun 4, 2015
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[quote="JamesCun"

And how do narrow bars enable this magical technique?

[/quote]

Before the perfect technique can be used, the bike has to be set up in such a way that the pulling line between hand on drop bar and shoulder will be parallel to the peak torque application line between hip and foot on pedal in the 1.30 o'c position, only narrow bars can make this possible.
 
Jun 1, 2014
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backdoor said:
JamesCun said:
And how do narrow bars enable this magical technique?
Before the perfect technique can be used, the bike has to be set up in such a way that the pulling line between hand on drop bar and shoulder will be parallel to the peak torque application line between hip and foot on pedal in the 1.30 o'c position, only narrow bars can make this possible.
Well, excellent news. This will make it even easier to test your perfect technique. You should see a noticeble difference just by switching handlebar width or hand position. You won't even need any special equipment. Just swap bars and do a time to exhaustion at threshold power. I eagerly await your test findings.
 

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