The pedaling technique thread

Page 52 - Get up to date with the latest news, scores & standings from the Cycling News Community.
Apr 21, 2009
3,095
0
0
Re: Re:

JamesCun said:
backdoor said:
JamesCun said:
And how do narrow bars enable this magical technique?
Before the perfect technique can be used, the bike has to be set up in such a way that the pulling line between hand on drop bar and shoulder will be parallel to the peak torque application line between hip and foot on pedal in the 1.30 o'c position, only narrow bars can make this possible.
Well, excellent news. This will make it even easier to test your perfect technique. You should see a noticeble difference just by switching handlebar width or hand position. You won't even need any special equipment. Just swap bars and do a time to exhaustion at threshold power. I eagerly await your test findings.
Yes, any power meter should be able to detect if a change in technique will have an improvement in performance. I am in the lab assisting with some research where the testing before and after the treatment is a 4000m erg test that measures average power. If your technique has any merit it is as easy as that to test.
 
Jun 4, 2015
785
0
3,280
Re: Re:

CoachFergie said:
JamesCun said:
backdoor said:
JamesCun said:
And how do narrow bars enable this magical technique?
Before the perfect technique can be used, the bike has to be set up in such a way that the pulling line between hand on drop bar and shoulder will be parallel to the peak torque application line between hip and foot on pedal in the 1.30 o'c position, only narrow bars can make this possible.
Well, excellent news. This will make it even easier to test your perfect technique. You should see a noticeble difference just by switching handlebar width or hand position. You won't even need any special equipment. Just swap bars and do a time to exhaustion at threshold power. I eagerly await your test findings.
Yes, any power meter should be able to detect if a change in technique will have an improvement in performance. I am in the lab assisting with some research where the testing before and after the treatment is a 4000m erg test that measures average power. If your technique has any merit it is as easy as that to test.
Before they would believe it, how long did it take the pro cycling world experts and their researchers to detect if a narrow hand aero position gave an advantage in time trials ? Sensible people use common sense.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AyvwtOQYQ-E&feature=related.
Only two questions to be answered here.
1. When at max power output, can the same max torque be applied at 12, 1 , 2 and 3 o'c.
2. If it can, why would it not result in a substantial improvement in flat non technical time trials.
Any powermeter will not answer question 1, could you answer question 2.

Interfering with the natural internal working of the body cannot be good.
 
Re: Re:

backdoor said:
...
Only two questions to be answered here.
1. When at max power output, can the same max torque be applied at 12, 1 , 2 and 3 o'c.
2. If it can, why would it not result in a substantial improvement in flat non technical time trials.
Any powermeter will not answer question 1, could you answer question 2.
...
-----------------------------------------------------
I don't understand why you think the amount of TORQUE itself is of primary importance. I think it is generally accepted that 'average power' is more indicative of performance. AND also why specifically at 12/1/2/3 o'c?

Jay Kosta
Endwell NY USA
 
Jun 1, 2014
385
0
0
Re: Re:

backdoor said:
CoachFergie said:
JamesCun said:
backdoor said:
JamesCun said:
And how do narrow bars enable this magical technique?
Before the perfect technique can be used, the bike has to be set up in such a way that the pulling line between hand on drop bar and shoulder will be parallel to the peak torque application line between hip and foot on pedal in the 1.30 o'c position, only narrow bars can make this possible.
Well, excellent news. This will make it even easier to test your perfect technique. You should see a noticeble difference just by switching handlebar width or hand position. You won't even need any special equipment. Just swap bars and do a time to exhaustion at threshold power. I eagerly await your test findings.
Yes, any power meter should be able to detect if a change in technique will have an improvement in performance. I am in the lab assisting with some research where the testing before and after the treatment is a 4000m erg test that measures average power. If your technique has any merit it is as easy as that to test.
Before they would believe it, how long did it take the pro cycling world experts and their researchers to detect if a narrow hand aero position gave an advantage in time trials ? Sensible people use common sense.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AyvwtOQYQ-E&feature=related.
Only two questions to be answered here.
1. When at max power output, can the same max torque be applied at 12, 1 , 2 and 3 o'c.
2. If it can, why would it not result in a substantial improvement in flat non technical time trials.
Any powermeter will not answer question 1, could you answer question 2.

Interfering with the natural internal working of the body cannot be good.
It is very simple. If you are saying an equipment change would directly impact this pedalling technique, all you need to do is pedal at threshold power with the two different equipment options. That will show how much more efficient you are with the optimal technique that is only possible with the optimal equipment selection. If you can hold 400w with less energy expenditure because of this 'natural technique' that will be readily apparent when you test with any system. You could also just do a fixed distance on the track as mentioned above...do a 4000m TT and you will obviously go faster with your narrow handlebars and natural technique.
 
Apr 21, 2009
3,095
0
0
Re: Re:

It is very simple. If you are saying an equipment change would directly impact this pedalling technique, all you need to do is pedal at threshold power with the two different equipment options. That will show how much more efficient you are with the optimal technique that is only possible with the optimal equipment selection. If you can hold 400w with less energy expenditure because of this 'natural technique' that will be readily apparent when you test with any system. You could also just do a fixed distance on the track as mentioned above...do a 4000m TT and you will obviously go faster with your narrow handlebars and natural technique.
Paging Dr Chung. The one who developed a method for doing this.

That being said the nine year old daughter of a rider I coach performed a study showing faster speeds descending off a hill between sitting upright and tucking right down.

See Noel, a nine year old gets it :cool:
 
Jun 4, 2015
785
0
3,280
Re: Re:

JayKosta said:
backdoor said:
...
Only two questions to be answered here.
1. When at max power output, can the same max torque be applied at 12, 1 , 2 and 3 o'c.
2. If it can, why would it not result in a substantial improvement in flat non technical time trials.
Any powermeter will not answer question 1, could you answer question 2.
...
-----------------------------------------------------
I don't understand why you think the amount of TORQUE itself is of primary importance. I think it is generally accepted that 'average power' is more indicative of performance. AND also why specifically at 12/1/2/3 o'c?

Jay Kosta
Endwell NY USA
Engineers have wasted years of research time trying to invent equipment that would compensate in some small way for the inability of all riders to apply effective torque between 11-1 o'c. The fact is, it's not only possible to apply the same max torque there as that applied between 2-4 o'c. but it is also possible to eliminate wasted force between 1-2 o'c. As I asked CF and got no answer, what would prevent this special pedalling technique from improving performance ? The only study needed here would be to discover the amount of improvement.
 
Jun 1, 2014
385
0
0
Re: Re:

backdoor said:
JayKosta said:
backdoor said:
...
Only two questions to be answered here.
1. When at max power output, can the same max torque be applied at 12, 1 , 2 and 3 o'c.
2. If it can, why would it not result in a substantial improvement in flat non technical time trials.
Any powermeter will not answer question 1, could you answer question 2.
...
-----------------------------------------------------
I don't understand why you think the amount of TORQUE itself is of primary importance. I think it is generally accepted that 'average power' is more indicative of performance. AND also why specifically at 12/1/2/3 o'c?

Jay Kosta
Endwell NY USA
Engineers have wasted years of research time trying to invent equipment that would compensate in some small way for the inability of all riders to apply effective torque between 11-1 o'c. The fact is, it's not only possible to apply the same max torque there as that applied between 2-4 o'c. but it is also possible to eliminate wasted force between 1-2 o'c. As I asked CF and got no answer, what would prevent this special pedalling technique from improving performance ? The only study needed here would be to discover the amount of improvement.
Please do some tests with a power meter and demonstrate a difference in efficiency with your perfect technique. Everything you have written to this point is rambling assumptions based on a video from 50yrs ago with a guy pedalling a bike. It is so simple for you to demonstrate how much better your imagined technique is, why the opposition to proving your assumptions?
 
Jun 4, 2015
785
0
3,280
Re: Re:

CoachFergie said:
It is very simple. If you are saying an equipment change would directly impact this pedalling technique, all you need to do is pedal at threshold power with the two different equipment options. That will show how much more efficient you are with the optimal technique that is only possible with the optimal equipment selection. If you can hold 400w with less energy expenditure because of this 'natural technique' that will be readily apparent when you test with any system. You could also just do a fixed distance on the track as mentioned above...do a 4000m TT and you will obviously go faster with your narrow handlebars and natural technique.
Paging Dr Chung. The one who developed a method for doing this.

That being said the nine year old daughter of a rider I coach performed a study showing faster speeds descending off a hill between sitting upright and tucking right down.

See Noel, a nine year old gets it :cool:
Yes she did, but like the pro experts until 1989, she forgot the arms. How is your lab testing progressing, have ye improved performance in a safe and legal way.
 
Re: Re:

backdoor said:
...
As I asked CF and got no answer, what would prevent this special pedalling technique from improving performance ? The only study needed here would be to discover the amount of improvement.
--------------------------------------------------------------
The important point isn't
'what would prevent your special technique
from improving performance',
but
'why isn't anyone interested in testing and reporting the results of your technique?'.

And yes, a well-designed and executed study of your technique could yield useful data about its effectiveness. But people aren't inclined to invest the effort for something they view as 'sure to fail', or which will not produce any useful new information.

Find someone willing to be a test subject for your technique, and then perhaps a study will be done.

Jay Kosta
Endwell NY USA
 
Jun 1, 2014
385
0
0
Re: Re:

JayKosta said:
backdoor said:
...
As I asked CF and got no answer, what would prevent this special pedalling technique from improving performance ? The only study needed here would be to discover the amount of improvement.
--------------------------------------------------------------
The important point isn't
'what would prevent your special technique
from improving performance',
but
'why isn't anyone interested in testing and reporting the results of your technique?'.

And yes, a well-designed and executed study of your technique could yield useful data about its effectiveness. But people aren't inclined to invest the effort for something they view as 'sure to fail', or which will not produce any useful new information.

Find someone willing to be a test subject for your technique, and then perhaps a study will be done.

Jay Kosta
Endwell NY USA
The first step would be to show that he can increase efficiency in his own riding, as someone who has practiced and thought about this technique extensively. He has already stated the exact way to do this. You apparently can't use this natural technique with wide bars. So, just slap some wide bars on a bike and do a fixed distance or fixed power ride. Then, put the optimal narrow bars on the bike and do the same thing. Any difference in the range he is describing should be very noticble in either reduced time over a fixed distance or increased time at a fixed power. No special equipment needed, no study needed, no subjects needed. If he could present this simple data, someone with more experience and access to the necessary testing could then do a study to investigate further. But, there is currently nothing but some random musings on the back of a napkin that don't stand up to any form of scrutiny.
 
Any intervention, be it equipment, position, technique, training efforts, diet, drugs, recovery etc, only needs to demonstrate it results (with statistical significance) in a rider producing or sustaining more power over durations of relevance when compared with not performing the intervention (ceteris paribus).

Despite his claims, Noel has never demonstrated this to be the case with his described method.

Contrary to what Noel might think, if he can do the above, then we will all be shouting it from the rooftops. I'm not however expecting to get a sore throat any time soon.
 
Jun 4, 2015
785
0
3,280
Re: Re:

JamesCun said:
JayKosta said:
backdoor said:
...
As I asked CF and got no answer, what would prevent this special pedalling technique from improving performance ? The only study needed here would be to discover the amount of improvement.
--------------------------------------------------------------
The important point isn't
'what would prevent your special technique
from improving performance',
but
'why isn't anyone interested in testing and reporting the results of your technique?'.

And yes, a well-designed and executed study of your technique could yield useful data about its effectiveness. But people aren't inclined to invest the effort for something they view as 'sure to fail', or which will not produce any useful new information.

Find someone willing to be a test subject for your technique, and then perhaps a study will be done.

Jay Kosta
Endwell NY USA
The first step would be to show that he can increase efficiency in his own riding, as someone who has practiced and thought about this technique extensively. He has already stated the exact way to do this. You apparently can't use this natural technique with wide bars. So, just slap some wide bars on a bike and do a fixed distance or fixed power ride. Then, put the optimal narrow bars on the bike and do the same thing. Any difference in the range he is describing should be very noticble in either reduced time over a fixed distance or increased time at a fixed power. No special equipment needed, no study needed, no subjects needed. If he could present this simple data, someone with more experience and access to the necessary testing could then do a study to investigate further. But, there is currently nothing but some random musings on the back of a napkin that don't stand up to any form of scrutiny.
The technique can be used with shoulder width bars, Anquetil used it. The narrower bars put the icing on the cake where both aerodynamics and increased power is concerned.
 
Jun 4, 2015
785
0
3,280
Re:

Alex Simmons/RST said:
Any intervention, be it equipment, position, technique, training efforts, diet, drugs, recovery etc, only needs to demonstrate it results (with statistical significance) in a rider producing or sustaining more power over durations of relevance when compared with not performing the intervention (ceteris paribus).

Despite his claims, Noel has never demonstrated this to be the case with his described method.

Contrary to what Noel might think, if he can do the above, then we will all be shouting it from the rooftops. I'm not however expecting to get a sore throat any time soon.
There has been much controversy about which is best high or low cadence. This could be ended if researchers were aware of the fact that a special high gear technique existed which could increase torque from a pedal stroke while decreasing peak force to the pedal. Not much point in getting a sore throat if you don't know how it's done.
 
Apr 21, 2009
3,095
0
0
Re: Re:

backdoor said:
JamesCun said:
JayKosta said:
backdoor said:
...
As I asked CF and got no answer, what would prevent this special pedalling technique from improving performance ? The only study needed here would be to discover the amount of improvement.
--------------------------------------------------------------
The important point isn't
'what would prevent your special technique
from improving performance',
but
'why isn't anyone interested in testing and reporting the results of your technique?'.

And yes, a well-designed and executed study of your technique could yield useful data about its effectiveness. But people aren't inclined to invest the effort for something they view as 'sure to fail', or which will not produce any useful new information.

Find someone willing to be a test subject for your technique, and then perhaps a study will be done.

Jay Kosta
Endwell NY USA
The first step would be to show that he can increase efficiency in his own riding, as someone who has practiced and thought about this technique extensively. He has already stated the exact way to do this. You apparently can't use this natural technique with wide bars. So, just slap some wide bars on a bike and do a fixed distance or fixed power ride. Then, put the optimal narrow bars on the bike and do the same thing. Any difference in the range he is describing should be very noticble in either reduced time over a fixed distance or increased time at a fixed power. No special equipment needed, no study needed, no subjects needed. If he could present this simple data, someone with more experience and access to the necessary testing could then do a study to investigate further. But, there is currently nothing but some random musings on the back of a napkin that don't stand up to any form of scrutiny.
The technique can be used with shoulder width bars, Anquetil used it. The narrower bars put the icing on the cake where both aerodynamics and increased power is concerned.
An increase in power you say? Should be very easy to demonstrate. Any power meter can be used. A person could test this alternating techniques several times. An increase in power will be obvious. I am surprised that someone so convinced of this has not gone to the trouble of confirming it.
 
Apr 21, 2009
3,095
0
0
Re: Re:

backdoor said:
Alex Simmons/RST said:
Any intervention, be it equipment, position, technique, training efforts, diet, drugs, recovery etc, only needs to demonstrate it results (with statistical significance) in a rider producing or sustaining more power over durations of relevance when compared with not performing the intervention (ceteris paribus).

Despite his claims, Noel has never demonstrated this to be the case with his described method.

Contrary to what Noel might think, if he can do the above, then we will all be shouting it from the rooftops. I'm not however expecting to get a sore throat any time soon.
There has been much controversy about which is best high or low cadence. This could be ended if researchers were aware of the fact that a special high gear technique existed which could increase torque from a pedal stroke while decreasing peak force to the pedal. Not much point in getting a sore throat if you don't know how it's done.
Pathetic Noel, truly pathetic, your claims are meaningless without evidence!
 
Re: Re:

backdoor said:
Alex Simmons/RST said:
Any intervention, be it equipment, position, technique, training efforts, diet, drugs, recovery etc, only needs to demonstrate it results (with statistical significance) in a rider producing or sustaining more power over durations of relevance when compared with not performing the intervention (ceteris paribus).

Despite his claims, Noel has never demonstrated this to be the case with his described method.

Contrary to what Noel might think, if he can do the above, then we will all be shouting it from the rooftops. I'm not however expecting to get a sore throat any time soon.
There has been much controversy about which is best high or low cadence. This could be ended if researchers were aware of the fact that a special high gear technique existed which could increase torque from a pedal stroke while decreasing peak force to the pedal. Not much point in getting a sore throat if you don't know how it's done.
Noel, riders can either produce more power with this magical method or they can't.

And you can either demonstrate the increase in power is real or you can't. Cycling power output measurement has been available since the late 1800s, so I'm not sure what's stopping you from proving your claims.

So stop obfuscating and come up with the data.
 
Jun 18, 2015
171
2
3,835
Re: Re:

backdoor said:
a special high gear technique existed which could increase torque from a pedal stroke while decreasing peak force to the pedal.
A few questions:
1. Why do you refuse all invitations to show the world your superduper pedaling technique?
2. Do you actually ride a bike at all?
3. If so, do you race?
4. If so, do you have any noteworthy results?
Inquiring minds want to know!
 
Jun 4, 2015
785
0
3,280
Re: Re:

PhitBoy said:
backdoor said:
a special high gear technique existed which could increase torque from a pedal stroke while decreasing peak force to the pedal.
A few questions:
1. Why do you refuse all invitations to show the world your superduper pedaling technique?
2. Do you actually ride a bike at all?
3. If so, do you race?
4. If so, do you have any noteworthy results?
Inquiring minds want to know!
The pedalling is no different from Anquetil's in his hour record videos with peak torque being delivered at a 45 deg. angle instead of downward. I took up cycling in my early forties to lose weight after quitting cigs. As soon as I got into competitive cycling I suffered from severe lower back pain, which began during the second mile and continued to increase in intensity until I either got out of the saddle or off the bike. In road races I had to pull out after one lap, time trialling was no better but I did ride through the pain on a few occasions and won some 10 m events with my home made narrower bars.. After over 10 years of this suffering I did mostly touring where I could stop for relief. One afternoon as I returned home I passed a 180 deg. hand cranking trike rider and had the idea of biomechanically combining that hand power with leg power. Within a week I had the basic technique, which meant switching from downward max power to applying it at that 45 deg. angle. Even more important for me, with this pedalling I was completely free from lower back pain. I spent the following years experimenting and perfecting the technique. But by then time trialling had changed, riders were now buying time saving equipment at ridiculous prices and our non technical straight out and back main road courses were replaced with technical circuits on minor roads which were not suitable for this high gear technique. I continue to train and hope to return to some track pursuit races next year.
 
Re: Re:

backdoor said:
PhitBoy said:
backdoor said:
a special high gear technique existed which could increase torque from a pedal stroke while decreasing peak force to the pedal.
A few questions:
1. Why do you refuse all invitations to show the world your superduper pedaling technique?
2. Do you actually ride a bike at all?
3. If so, do you race?
4. If so, do you have any noteworthy results?
Inquiring minds want to know!
The pedalling is no different from Anquetil's in his hour record videos with peak torque being delivered at a 45 deg. angle instead of downward. I took up cycling in my early forties to lose weight after quitting cigs. As soon as I got into competitive cycling I suffered from severe lower back pain, which began during the second mile and continued to increase in intensity until I either got out of the saddle or off the bike. In road races I had to pull out after one lap, time trialling was no better but I did ride through the pain on a few occasions and won some 10 m events with my home made narrower bars.. After over 10 years of this suffering I did mostly touring where I could stop for relief. One afternoon as I returned home I passed a 180 deg. hand cranking trike rider and had the idea of biomechanically combining that hand power with leg power. Within a week I had the basic technique, which meant switching from downward max power to applying it at that 45 deg. angle. Even more important for me, with this pedalling I was completely free from lower back pain. I spent the following years experimenting and perfecting the technique. But by then time trialling had changed, riders were now buying time saving equipment at ridiculous prices and our non technical straight out and back main road courses were replaced with technical circuits on minor roads which were not suitable for this high gear technique. I continue to train and hope to return to some track pursuit races next year.
Show us the data Noel.
 
Apr 21, 2009
3,095
0
0
Re: Re:

backdoor said:
PhitBoy said:
backdoor said:
a special high gear technique existed which could increase torque from a pedal stroke while decreasing peak force to the pedal.
A few questions:
1. Why do you refuse all invitations to show the world your superduper pedaling technique?
2. Do you actually ride a bike at all?
3. If so, do you race?
4. If so, do you have any noteworthy results?
Inquiring minds want to know!
The pedalling is no different from Anquetil's in his hour record videos with peak torque being delivered at a 45 deg. angle instead of downward. I took up cycling in my early forties to lose weight after quitting cigs. As soon as I got into competitive cycling I suffered from severe lower back pain, which began during the second mile and continued to increase in intensity until I either got out of the saddle or off the bike. In road races I had to pull out after one lap, time trialling was no better but I did ride through the pain on a few occasions and won some 10 m events with my home made narrower bars.. After over 10 years of this suffering I did mostly touring where I could stop for relief. One afternoon as I returned home I passed a 180 deg. hand cranking trike rider and had the idea of biomechanically combining that hand power with leg power. Within a week I had the basic technique, which meant switching from downward max power to applying it at that 45 deg. angle. Even more important for me, with this pedalling I was completely free from lower back pain. I spent the following years experimenting and perfecting the technique. But by then time trialling had changed, riders were now buying time saving equipment at ridiculous prices and our non technical straight out and back main road courses were replaced with technical circuits on minor roads which were not suitable for this high gear technique. I continue to train and hope to return to some track pursuit races next year.
We didn't ask for your opinion Noel. Data or it is just your imagination.
 
Jun 4, 2015
785
0
3,280
Re: Re:

CoachFergie said:
backdoor said:
PhitBoy said:
backdoor said:
a special high gear technique existed which could increase torque from a pedal stroke while decreasing peak force to the pedal.
A few questions:
1. Why do you refuse all invitations to show the world your superduper pedaling technique?
2. Do you actually ride a bike at all?
3. If so, do you race?
4. If so, do you have any noteworthy results?
Inquiring minds want to know!
The pedalling is no different from Anquetil's in his hour record videos with peak torque being delivered at a 45 deg. angle instead of downward. I took up cycling in my early forties to lose weight after quitting cigs. As soon as I got into competitive cycling I suffered from severe lower back pain, which began during the second mile and continued to increase in intensity until I either got out of the saddle or off the bike. In road races I had to pull out after one lap, time trialling was no better but I did ride through the pain on a few occasions and won some 10 m events with my home made narrower bars.. After over 10 years of this suffering I did mostly touring where I could stop for relief. One afternoon as I returned home I passed a 180 deg. hand cranking trike rider and had the idea of biomechanically combining that hand power with leg power. Within a week I had the basic technique, which meant switching from downward max power to applying it at that 45 deg. angle. Even more important for me, with this pedalling I was completely free from lower back pain. I spent the following years experimenting and perfecting the technique. But by then time trialling had changed, riders were now buying time saving equipment at ridiculous prices and our non technical straight out and back main road courses were replaced with technical circuits on minor roads which were not suitable for this high gear technique. I continue to train and hope to return to some track pursuit races next year.
We didn't ask for your opinion Noel. Data or it is just your imagination.

Data will not power the cranks, only technique can do that. As you have already stated, endless pages of data from over 500 studies are available for anyone to read, and if like you they are prepared to waste time studying it, they will be no wiser at the finish than at the start. What amazes me is why after all my detailed explanations as to how it's done nobody is willing to experiment and search for the technique. I did what I set out to do after reading several books on pedalling technique when I first took up cycling and that was to find the secret of Anquetil's mysterious extra pedal power in time trials, which also happens to be the perfect pedalling technique that all experts like yourself claim does not exist. I spent several years searching for it from photos but failed as they reveal absolutely nothing as to how muscles are working.
 
Apr 21, 2009
3,095
0
0
Re: Re:

backdoor said:
CoachFergie said:
backdoor said:
PhitBoy said:
backdoor said:
a special high gear technique existed which could increase torque from a pedal stroke while decreasing peak force to the pedal.
A few questions:
1. Why do you refuse all invitations to show the world your superduper pedaling technique?
2. Do you actually ride a bike at all?
3. If so, do you race?
4. If so, do you have any noteworthy results?
Inquiring minds want to know!
The pedalling is no different from Anquetil's in his hour record videos with peak torque being delivered at a 45 deg. angle instead of downward. I took up cycling in my early forties to lose weight after quitting cigs. As soon as I got into competitive cycling I suffered from severe lower back pain, which began during the second mile and continued to increase in intensity until I either got out of the saddle or off the bike. In road races I had to pull out after one lap, time trialling was no better but I did ride through the pain on a few occasions and won some 10 m events with my home made narrower bars.. After over 10 years of this suffering I did mostly touring where I could stop for relief. One afternoon as I returned home I passed a 180 deg. hand cranking trike rider and had the idea of biomechanically combining that hand power with leg power. Within a week I had the basic technique, which meant switching from downward max power to applying it at that 45 deg. angle. Even more important for me, with this pedalling I was completely free from lower back pain. I spent the following years experimenting and perfecting the technique. But by then time trialling had changed, riders were now buying time saving equipment at ridiculous prices and our non technical straight out and back main road courses were replaced with technical circuits on minor roads which were not suitable for this high gear technique. I continue to train and hope to return to some track pursuit races next year.
We didn't ask for your opinion Noel. Data or it is just your imagination.

Data will not power the cranks, only technique can do that. As you have already stated, endless pages of data from over 500 studies are available for anyone to read, and if like you they are prepared to waste time studying it, they will be no wiser at the finish than at the start. What amazes me is why after all my detailed explanations as to how it's done nobody is willing to experiment and search for the technique. I did what I set out to do after reading several books on pedalling technique when I first took up cycling and that was to find the secret of Anquetil's mysterious extra pedal power in time trials, which also happens to be the perfect pedalling technique that all experts like yourself claim does not exist. I spent several years searching for it from photos but failed as they reveal absolutely nothing as to how muscles are working.
We didn't ask for your opinion Noel, we asked for data.
 
Re: Re:

Noel,

If you have access to anyone local who owns a Verve Infocrank, it looks like you'll soon be able to provide us with some actual data illustrating your wondrous pedaling technique.

From DCrainmaker's recent review found here-
http://www.dcrainmaker.com/2015/11/verve-infocrank-review.html

"Pedal Stroke Analysis: In January, they’ll launch a firmware update that’ll allow you to use their torque analysis and pedal stroke analysis app. This will take readings at 256 times a second and also pipe that information into the pedal smoothness metrics. But folks will be able to look at the raw data within the software suite directly."

So this coming January you aught to be able to provide us with some actual evidence that you're pedaling the way you think you're pedaling. I'll bet you'll be able to walk into a local Verve dealer and do a test ride right on a bike set up on one of their trainers.

Until then we will all be waiting with bated breath......well perhaps some of us;)

Hugh
 
Jun 4, 2015
785
0
3,280
Re: Re:

CoachFergie said:
[quote="[

An increase in power you say? Should be very easy to demonstrate. Any power meter can be used. A person could test this alternating techniques several times. An increase in power will be obvious. I am surprised that someone so convinced of this has not gone to the trouble of confirming it.
This coach does not see the pedalling of young riders in the same way that you see it.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
" Let's see, I've been coaching over a dozen new riders each fall for the past 15 years, 80% use the wrong muscle to push down
My program offers something a little different, a learning process. All of the power based training programs make the bold assumption that you know how to pedal, so the gains are fitness. My clients find that gains aren't just about fitness - I'm not going to be pushing fitness for months. Seeing progress is a far better way of keeping people in the program.

I also offer a full money back guarantee, if you don't like my program I'll give you your money back. "
__________________
 
Re: Re:

backdoor said:
...
This coach does not see the pedalling of young riders in the same way that you see it.
...
---------------------
Interesting, but WHO is that coach, any website or online references?
Without additional information, it's useless and suspect.

Jay Kosta
Endwell NY USA
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS

Latest posts